Old 07-23-2019, 09:53 AM   #1
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Default The realtime kernel patchset

Some nice news. The process of integrating the realtime patchset in the mainline kernel has started. Linus pulled a first patch the other day which means that he is OK with merging it.

This paves the way to having realtime kernels in all/most distros. In the future it won't be an out of tree patch, just another kernel option to enable.
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Old 07-23-2019, 10:56 AM   #2
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How long after that initial step would be the expected timeframe before it hits distros, knowing that some like Arch will get it sooner than others?
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Old 07-23-2019, 02:05 PM   #3
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I haven't gotten the faintest idea

Once it's in mainline it might take a long time until it reaches distros that use a stable/old patched kernels, other distros will have it quite rapidly.

But the important things is that it gets mainlined and will no longer be an out of the kernel tree patch. That also means that other drivers like for instance the nvidia driver has to be completely compatible with it.
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Old 07-23-2019, 04:19 PM   #4
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It will be interesting to see if as a result of having to support a RT kernel whether any improvement in general will happen with nVidia's Linux drivers. They seem fairly unimpressive to me when comparing the exact same hardware running Windows, which feels butter smooth.
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Old 07-31-2019, 10:53 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Winter View Post
Some nice news. The process of integrating the realtime patchset in the mainline kernel has started. Linus pulled a first patch the other day which means that he is OK with merging it.

This paves the way to having realtime kernels in all/most distros. In the future it won't be an out of tree patch, just another kernel option to enable.
I know that about 80% of the Realtime patches have already been mainlined, but I've heard no new information about further integration. I'd be very interested in reading more about this. Would you please post a link to the announcement? Thanks!
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Old 08-01-2019, 03:03 AM   #6
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There was no announcement per se. An initial patch was posted and pulled by Linus which means that the process has started.

http://lkml.iu.edu/hypermail/linux/k...7.1/07151.html
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Old 08-01-2019, 10:20 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Winter View Post
There was no announcement per se. An initial patch was posted and pulled by Linus which means that the process has started.

http://lkml.iu.edu/hypermail/linux/k...7.1/07151.html
Interesting! I'd sure love to see the final 20% get integrated into the mainline! That would go a long way towards making the tuning of Linux faster and easier for regular musicians.
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Old 08-02-2019, 06:05 AM   #8
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It will make it easier to build the rt kernel and also means that it will become much easier to get it for some distros. All in all a very good thing.
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Old 08-02-2019, 07:54 AM   #9
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Here's an interesting (related) new thread from over at the LinuxMusicians site:

https://linuxmusicians.com/viewtopic.php?f=24&t=19123
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Old 08-02-2019, 07:58 AM   #10
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Even more info:

https://www.heise.de/ct/artikel/Die-...g-4470638.html

Translated to English:

The Linux version expected in mid-September should pave the way for real-time support. Nvidia's driver will probably not work on power systems.

Support for AMD's new graphics chip architecture is one of the highlights of Linux 5.3. The kernel version expected on 9 or 16 September will also pave the way for real-time support (real-time support) in Linux. The main development branch of the kernel has undergone a change with a new kernel configuration option , which eventually allows it to build a fully preemptible kernel (real-time / RT). These can meet real-time requirements - guaranteeing that certain work can be done even under adverse conditions within a pre-defined period of time.

Adaptation with signal effect
The changes with the CONFIG_PREEMPT_RT configuration option give the impression that the real-time Linux patch collection PREEMPT_RT , developed almost fifteen years ago, has finally moved into the official kernel. Many adaptations developed in this "RT tree" have already moved to Linux in recent years. Now follows the configuration option - much else that is important for contemporary real-time operation, but remains for the time being in the RT tree.

c't / Thorsten Leemhuis
The new option to build a real-time kernel has not yet been revealed, because it should have one thing in particular: signal effect.
(Photo: c't / Thorsten Leemhuis)
The configuration option is also not for the moment. However, their integration is still an important step forward: It signals to the world that Torvalds & Co. intends to integrate the remaining real-time patches in the RT-Tree in the near future, even though Torvalds was originally rather skeptical of the idea. In particular, kernel developers who are not interested in real-time patches should be motivated not to cross the gap when reviewing and integrating remaining real-time changes to the RT tree. That's not all that many, but there are some that affect the core and therefore critical infrastructure of the Linux kernel, where developers take special care.

Patches for 5.3 may follow, which still shows the configuration option. It remains uncertain, however, how long the integration of the adjustments remaining in the RT-Tree will require; its developers had planned last autumn , all essentials in 2019 in the official Linux kernel to convict. The remaining time is getting short.

Further highlights of Linux 5.3
In addition to the patch intended to pave the way for real-time support, Linux 5.3 brings many other significant new features:

The Netfilter subsystem, which is mainly used for firewalls, can now delegate some work to appropriate hardware, which offloads the main processor and increases throughput.
Linux now also supports IPv4 addresses in the 0.0.0.0/8 range , making about 16 million more addresses available; Linux has so far omitted this section because there were some interoperability issues with BSD variants in the eighties with these addresses.
Linux now supports the x86 processor architecture of the Chinese company Zhaoxin .
Thanks to a cache, Ext4 should now work a bit faster if it ignores case insensitivity via the "Casefold Feature" introduced in Linux 5.2 .
The time travel mode allows the clock to run slower or faster in User Mode Linux.
The time travel mode allows the clock to run slower or faster in User Mode Linux.
(Picture: Screenshot of git.kernel.org - 065038706f77 )
User Mode Linux (UML) now offers a "time travel" feature - but not a real one, because the new "Time Travel Mode" allows the clock to run slower or faster than real in UML environments. This feature is intended for experimental purposes, for example, to speed up tests designed to test longer wait times.
Nvidia's proprietary Linux driver is unlikely to run on systems with a power architecture, because PPC kernel code maintainers removed some interfaces during cleanup that are no longer used inside the kernel (including 1 , 2 , 3 , 4) , 5 ). However, Nvidia's proprietary graphics drivers for power systems have relied heavily on them. However , the responsible kernel developers did not take this into account because, from their point of view, it is a kernel-internal interface. It would be something else when it comes to interfaces between kernels and applications (the userspace ABI): changes that interfere with existing programs are taboo there.
With a Cpufreq driver for Raspberry Pi, Linux is now able to control the clock speed of the popular one-board computer's processor.
The Linux kernel now masters the recently defined x86 instructions Umonitor, Umwait, and Tpause, which Intel intends to support on some new processors; Programs can wait with these for a short time, but do not burden the CPU with unnecessary work, as do the Busy Loops often used in such situations.
With support for Intel Speed ​​Select Technology (ISST) , admins can now better adapt the power-saving performance of some modern Xeon processors to their specific circumstances and needs.
The firmware files required by many drivers during initialization may now also be compressed, which saves disk space.
The developers have removed the ISDN4Linux stack along with its previously well-known ISDN driver Hisax. The younger CAPI stack has migrated to the staging branch, because even with him, the developers are considering the sacking. The mISDN support remains in the kernel. Details about this have already been explained in the kernel log for Linux 5.2 .
The Asus gaming notebooks of the TUF series should work better with Linux 5.3, because the keyboard driver, the fan control and some of the function keys of the Asus-Wmi driver support this device series.
The video acceleration driver Cedrus can now also delegate the decoding of H264 to the hardware. Driven primarily by crowdfunding campaigning, this driver addresses the video engine of some Allwinner processors found on a number of single-board computers.
Intel's video driver can now use HDR (High Dynamic Range) for screen control. For users to be able to use it, userspace programs and desktops first have to learn how to use this kernel feature; besides, it only works with processors since the generations Ice Lake and Gemini Lake.
Linux 5.3 will improve hardware support thanks to many new and improved drivers. It now also supports AMD's new Navi10 graphics chip generation, which recently debuted on the Radeon RX-5700 series. Details can be found on the second page of this kernel log.
If the development follows the usual rhythm, Linux 5.3 should appear at night on the 9th or 16th September.

Gradually updated text to Linux 5.3
The new features expected on 9 or 16 September Linux 5.3 are foreseeable since July 22, as there Linus Torvalds has released the first pre-release version of this kernel version . As usual, he has completed the " merge window " phase of the development cycle in which he is making all the major changes to a new kernel version. Larger, noteworthy changes are made thereafter only in exceptional cases; It also happens extremely rarely that he deactivates or even removes extensive changes integrated in the Merge Window before they are completed.

The c't in this kernel log can now already describe details about the innovations of the next Linux version. Since there are so many changes in different areas, we are expanding the text several times between the initial publication and the completion of the new kernel to progressively explain the key changes in more manageable quantities. The article therefore only describes a few highlights of Linux 5.3; it will be followed by text enhancements that are closer to the innovations in video drivers, infrastructure, file systems & storage, network support and security and provide more details on the highlights.

The news ticker from heise online and the Twitter account @kernellog mention larger extensions of the kernel log to the next Linux version. You can always find the latest update on the first article page, older text passages on the following pages. Details on the version history of the article are provided by the changelog at the end of the article .
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