Old 10-31-2006, 01:44 AM   #1
Rocket Boy
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Default Putting Reaper to the test...

I'm going to be using Reaper to record an hour and a half long piano recital in a couple of days. This will be using the evaluation version(if that's a problem?), although I'll definitely be buying it if it does this well.

My question basically is, has anyone had any trouble recording this much audio into Reaper for an extended period? It's very intuitive, so I enjoy using it for audio a lot. I just wanted to make sure there are no stability issues I need to be aware of, since this is a paying job.
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Old 10-31-2006, 07:31 AM   #2
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rocket boy...
i'd be surprised if you had a problem.
but BEFORE the recital why dont you run a 2 hr test ?? and see ?? cos each one of us has different computer configs.
be aware youll need lots of disc space.
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Old 10-31-2006, 08:32 AM   #3
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I'm sure Art Evans will be chiming in any moment now. He does that sort of recording all the time. You might even want to search for posts by him as he may have already discussed this.
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Old 10-31-2006, 10:10 AM   #4
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I´ve recorded 24tracks for 2 hours a couple of times. No problems at all.
I´ve also made a 8 hours session, but i stopped in the breaks between bands, so it oonly counts as 1 1/2 hour recordings.
But as mentioned before, do a test BEFORE, and be sure you have space enough.
Turn of any screensavers, and any battery saving stuff, if on a laptop.

But if you have any troubles, i doubt it will be with reaper, more likely with somesetup in your machine.
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Old 10-31-2006, 11:14 AM   #5
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done 12-13 tracks for over an hour at a time. the only thing i do to be safe is make sure the timeline is zoomed out to more than your recording time before you start. that way there's no chance of a screen redraw giving you any headaches.

-d. gauss
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Old 10-31-2006, 11:16 AM   #6
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I've recorded many sessions of 2-8 hours, of 16+ tracks, both to .WAV and to wavpack, without issue... on a 2.8ghz P4 with MOTU FW interfaces...

-J
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Old 10-31-2006, 02:32 PM   #7
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Indeed, I record classical concerts weekly with Reaper, and apart from one problem (subsequently fixed in 24 hrs by Justin once identified) all has gone well. Advice above about doing some thorough testing with your particular setup is good, though. And make sure you yourself are up to the task in terms of familiarity with the program - what to do and what not to do.

One thing you could try would be identifying the "danger keys" - keys that if pressed accidentally during the recording could stuff it, such as the spacebar - and set up a keyboard shortcut set which disables them.
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Old 11-01-2006, 02:05 AM   #8
Rocket Boy
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Thanks guys. I've been using it a bit, so i feel familiar with the program... and I'll be recording onto a 160gb external HD so i think I should be okay in that department. I will definitely make sure my computer is set up for this as well. Thanks!
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Old 11-01-2006, 06:54 AM   #9
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Default No snap, crackle or pop...

I just finished up an audiodrama production last night using Reaper to record small segue bits and then importing some very large sound files into it for assembling the program and doing some post-production work. The total running time was almost 70 minutes and Reaper performed without hiccup, hangup or horror story no matter what I asked it to do.

Best of luck on your project,

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Old 11-01-2006, 04:07 PM   #10
Rocket Boy
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I recorded about an hour of 4 tracks of audio to test it out. On my computer, processor never really went above about 2-4%. Didn't seem to have any problems at all.
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Old 11-01-2006, 07:32 PM   #11
Art Evans
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One thing that's worth exploring on larger projects is how happy your system is with WavPack files instead of wave. This can save about half the disk space required for your data, and here there is no performance tradeoff that I can discern - I use WavPack (wv) files for everything, including live recording and CD mastering (using ReaBurn in conjunction with Burrrn, the space-saving wv master is unpacked and burnt to CD in the required wave format automatically).
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Old 11-02-2006, 03:32 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Art Evans
One thing that's worth exploring on larger projects is how happy your system is with WavPack files instead of wave. This can save about half the disk space required for your data, and here there is no performance tradeoff that I can discern - I use WavPack (wv) files for everything, including live recording and CD mastering (using ReaBurn in conjunction with Burrrn, the space-saving wv master is unpacked and burnt to CD in the required wave format automatically).
WavPack seems to be pretty good for live recording, but a bit of warning: recording large track counts directly to it may not be ideal... if the CPU use gets too high during recording it is possible, and depending on your sound hardware likely pretty rare, to get glitches (where the sound driver doesnt keep up due to high cpu load).. Just be sure to test recording to a specific format for a long period (at least on the order of 20-30m) before doing it in a live scenario, would be my advice.

-Justin
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Old 11-02-2006, 04:21 AM   #13
Art Evans
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Indeed - there must come a point with any compressed format where, although the drive is having an easier time, the CPU isn't, and you hit the wall.

As tends to be the way with classical music, my track counts are low. So I'm ok. But as Justin says, testing realistically is good - indeed with live recording, there's something to be said for giving the whole rig a good realworld benchtest soak before taking it out on the road - and if you carefully pack it right after that test, you can be reasonably sure you haven't left something vital back at base.
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