Old 10-16-2015, 07:31 AM   #1
acintya
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Default Is there a advanced tutorial for ReaComp?

I want a tutorial that covers everything.

the envelopse settings:

pre-comp
release
attack
ratio
knee size
lowpass
high pass


anything covered in detail. and also some examples of using it.
Is there something like that?
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Old 10-16-2015, 08:09 AM   #2
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You have already watched Kenny Gioias Using Compression In Reaper (ReaComp) video?
http://www.kennymania.com/videos/rea...eaper-reacomp/


Depending on what is considered "advanced", following threads, especially ashcat_lt replies may have some deeper examples:
ReaComp "Auto make-up" feature
http://forum.cockos.com/showthread.php?t=165966
Melda MCompressor
http://forum.cockos.com/showthread.php?t=165476
ReaComp RMS Size
http://forum.cockos.com/showthread.php?t=156201

I'm sure there's a lot more spread around in different topics, but not necessarily collected into one specific tutorial.
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Old 10-20-2015, 10:35 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitkonis View Post
pre-comp
release
attack
ratio
knee size
lowpass
high pass
Seeing as no one else has answered directly, I'll tackle this...
Pre-comp... this is a temporal look ahead function. If you set it for say 5ms, the compression circuit will always be looking 5ms ahead for any rapid transients which would otherwise sneak through without getting caught. Longer settings might cause latency issues. Suck it and see.

Release... like any compressor, this is the time it takes for the compression circuit to STOP controlling the dynamics, AFTER the signal level has fallen back below the threshold..

Attack... again, same as any other compressor. The time it takes for the compression circuit to react to an input signal ONCE that signal has exceeded the threshold.

Ratio... like it says on the box, this controls the ratio of input level to output level, after compression has been applied. Maths lesson coming at ya shortly....

Knee size... usually expressed in dB and referrs to a softening between signal NOT being compressed and signal which IS being compressed. Think of it as a smudging of the THRESHOLD value.

Lowpass... wherever you set this value, frequencies ABOVE wil not have any influence on the compression circuit.

High pass... just the opposite. Frequencies below whatever value you enter here will not have any influence on the compression circuit. This is far more critical than the lowpass value, as high amplitude low frequency content CAN seriously mess with your compression if you don't really understand how compression works (not saying you don't... just sayin').

OK, some maths....

Let's say you have a signal which peaks at exactly 0dBFS.
You set a ratio for say 5:1.
This means that for every 5dB of dynamic range you had in your signal BEFORE comrepssion was applied, you're going to have 1dB of dynamic range AFTER compression is applied.
So if you set your THRESHOLD for -5dBFS, in theory, your highest output value after compresison will be -4dBFS.
If you set your THRESHOLD at -10dBFS with a 5:1 compression ratio, then your highest level after compression should be -8dBFS.
Think it through. You'll get there.
Now, I say "SHOULD" because it all comes back to attack time. If your attack time is 10ms, but a drum transient reached 0dBFS in 8ms, guess what? You're shutting the gate after the horse has bolted. So, does that mean we should just default to the shortest attack time. No, it doesn't. But the answer to why is for another day/thread.
Have fun!
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Old 10-20-2015, 11:16 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by audio2u View Post
Lowpass... wherever you set this value, frequencies ABOVE wil not have any influence on the compression circuit.

High pass... just the opposite. Frequencies below whatever value you enter here will not have any influence on the compression circuit.
As always, this point is not communicated exactly. What means influenced?

Are the "outside" frequencies ignored for level detection or are these frequencies not compressed? Or both?
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Old 10-21-2015, 02:43 AM   #5
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Cool explanation for beginners.
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Old 10-21-2015, 03:36 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by earforce View Post
As always, this point is not communicated exactly. What means influenced?

Are the "outside" frequencies ignored for level detection or are these frequencies not compressed? Or both?
Good question

It means: Ignored for level-detection. All frequencies are compressed the same amount.

Typical used on drum-bus, masterbus and acoustic guitar for letting low frequencies pass and not make the compressor pumping.
You can listen to an example here:
http://www.jlmaudio.com/shop/la500-opto-comp.html
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Old 10-21-2015, 10:57 AM   #7
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The basic compression controls are usually explained pretty much the same way everywhere, just like above. Probably most compressor users have found their way following those guidelines and experimenting till they are satisfied with what they got. But those basic principles might actually be a little different than usually said.

Gregory Scott from Kush Audio, Demolishing the myths of compression
http://www.attackmagazine.com/featur...f-compression/
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Old 10-21-2015, 01:05 PM   #8
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Great article xpander - I love those geeky ones

May as well re-post this here, too, which was posted on this forum a while back:

http://quantum-music.ca/wordpress/in...-to-use-which/
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Old 10-21-2015, 04:14 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fergler View Post
Fergler,
Thanks for THAT link, too!
I just read it from top to bottom (and that's rare for me... I usually skim).
Awesome article.
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Old 10-22-2015, 03:44 AM   #10
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Within this ZIP is a good REAcomp review from Jeremy Dahl: https://stash.reaper.fm/4606/01.%20Ye...12-24-2009.zip

It's part of yep's thread "Why do your recordings Sound like ass?"
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Old 10-23-2015, 06:29 PM   #11
acintya
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Quote:
Originally Posted by audio2u View Post
Seeing as no one else has answered directly, I'll tackle this...
Pre-comp... this is a temporal look ahead function. If you set it for say 5ms, the compression circuit will always be looking 5ms ahead for any rapid transients which would otherwise sneak through without getting caught. Longer settings might cause latency issues. Suck it and see.

Release... like any compressor, this is the time it takes for the compression circuit to STOP controlling the dynamics, AFTER the signal level has fallen back below the threshold..

Attack... again, same as any other compressor. The time it takes for the compression circuit to react to an input signal ONCE that signal has exceeded the threshold.

Ratio... like it says on the box, this controls the ratio of input level to output level, after compression has been applied. Maths lesson coming at ya shortly....

Knee size... usually expressed in dB and referrs to a softening between signal NOT being compressed and signal which IS being compressed. Think of it as a smudging of the THRESHOLD value.

Lowpass... wherever you set this value, frequencies ABOVE wil not have any influence on the compression circuit.

High pass... just the opposite. Frequencies below whatever value you enter here will not have any influence on the compression circuit. This is far more critical than the lowpass value, as high amplitude low frequency content CAN seriously mess with your compression if you don't really understand how compression works (not saying you don't... just sayin').

OK, some maths....

Let's say you have a signal which peaks at exactly 0dBFS.
You set a ratio for say 5:1.
This means that for every 5dB of dynamic range you had in your signal BEFORE comrepssion was applied, you're going to have 1dB of dynamic range AFTER compression is applied.
So if you set your THRESHOLD for -5dBFS, in theory, your highest output value after compresison will be -4dBFS.
If you set your THRESHOLD at -10dBFS with a 5:1 compression ratio, then your highest level after compression should be -8dBFS.
Think it through. You'll get there.
Now, I say "SHOULD" because it all comes back to attack time. If your attack time is 10ms, but a drum transient reached 0dBFS in 8ms, guess what? You're shutting the gate after the horse has bolted. So, does that mean we should just default to the shortest attack time. No, it doesn't. But the answer to why is for another day/thread.
Have fun!
thanks a lot!!!!
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