Old 09-28-2015, 05:03 AM   #1
audio2u
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Default CPU temperature

I've done a search on the forum, but not seen anything specifically related to this....

I'm currently working on a MASSIVE mixing project.
And when I say massive, I mean north of 190 audio tracks and roughly 15 submix/parents (but never more than about 30 audio tracks playing at any one time).

My machine is home built and fairly well-spec'd.

* AMD 8350 octo-core/4GHz processor
* 16GB DDR3 RAM/667MHz
* Asustek Sabretooth 990FX motherboard
* Samsung SSD (OS drive)
* Bunch of 7200rpm optical drives (audio assets are here)
* M-Audio Fast Track Ultra 8R soundcard
* Gigabyte GeForce GTX760 4GB graphics card
* Win7 Professional 64 bit version

I gelled the CPU when I built this box, AND I have got the side of the PC case physically removed at the moment, so heat SHOULDN'T be an issue.
I'm looking at my motherboard's monitoring software right now, and the CPU temp is sitting around 46 degrees Celcius. As of this writing, it's early spring in Australia, and we are not exactly suffering from heat stress yet (January will be a different story!).
But, the moment I load up this Reaper project, you can actually hold you breath between single digit rises in the CPU temp. 15 mins ago, the machine shut itself down to protect the CPU. Yeah, I'd ignored the pop-up. Dumb move, I know.
My question is this.... why does the temperature of the CPU continue to climb even when the project is not actually playing? I can have the project open, but doing nothing, and I can sit here and watch the temp go through the roof within a couple of minutes.
And as soon as I exit Reaper (5.0.3/64 bit version), you instantly see the CPU temp start to fall. And within a minute or so, it's back down to where it's at now (mid 40's).
Thoughts?
Thanks in advance....
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Old 09-28-2015, 05:53 AM   #2
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CPU temp is most probably rising, because Reaper utilize your CPU.
Usual settings is, to run all FX chains even when playback is stopped.

You can also verify it by opening Performance Meter window at Reaper (Ctrl+Alt+P).
Possibly you can change this behavior at Preferences/Audio/Playback/Run FX when stopped.

But all of this is just symptom of hardware issue with cooling of your CPU, which needs to be sorted out.
System can be sluggish, unresponsive under some heavy workload, that's life, but it can't power down due to exceeding of thermal limits.
If it was working well before, I will probably check all computer fans (and clean dust if you find some), sometimes opened case is worse than closed one, because it breaks intended airflow through components. Then reapply thermal grease between CPU and heatsink and finally do some generic stress test.. Ideally with both CPU and graphic card.. (for instance SuperPI and FurMark simultaneously).
Additionally some aftermarket and more efficient CPU cooler can improve situation.
Last case is throwing whole AMD thing out of window.. Its Performance/TDP Watt ratio is very poor compared to Intel.. Especially with faster CPUs.

Good luck!

Michal
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Old 09-28-2015, 08:17 AM   #3
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yep

AMD's run way too hot...

however, check out the Corsair.com site and see if they have a liquid cooler that will work in your case...

I have an ever bigger home built pc, but with Intel cpu and one of their LC's
and it stays way cold...

I would NEVER use air [fans] cooling again.
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Old 09-28-2015, 09:30 AM   #4
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Unseated heatsink. Case open is bad for cooling. Heatsink is dirty or in size.

You should be able to run your system full bore for 24 hours without hiccups. There are programs to do sort of stress testing.

40c+ at idle is high. Best case you want 28c to 35c.
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Old 09-28-2015, 09:59 AM   #5
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For an AMD, 40C at idle is great.
What's not great is that temperatures continue to rise until the CPU overheats.
That definitely indicates a serious cooling problem. Might be that the CPU fan is not functioning correctly or is not controlled properly - check your firmware settings (aka BIOS).
Might be that the heatsink is not seated properly, as zyisrad said.
Might be that you need to replace your thermal paste. That is likely the case if you ever unscrewd the heatsink and didn't care to clean up and renew the paste. But can also occur naturally. Generally the advice is to replace the thermal paste once every 3 years or so.
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Old 09-28-2015, 01:36 PM   #6
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Thanks for the input, guys!
Msmucr's suggestion about disabling "run fx when stopped' was right on the money.
Having disabled that option, I now see CPU temp drop once I stop playback.
However, I also agree with all the other comments about this being indicative of a deeper hardware cooling related problem, which I shall investigate this weekend.
Yes, there is a little bit of dust on my heatsink, and I'll re-gel the heatsink/CPU barrier on Saturday and see if that improves things.
And if that doesn't improves things sufficiently, then I might just look into water-cooled options.
Thanks again!
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Old 09-28-2015, 02:12 PM   #7
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No need for fiddly, high maintenance water cooling, if you have space in your case.
Get a good, well rated (needn't be expensive) tower cooler with 120mm fan. You could run that slower for less noise AND get much lower temperatures too.


https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=am...tohV0Ac59iM%3A

Lots better than standard AMD and Intel coolers.

http://www.techpowerup.com/forums/th...12-evo.200968/
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Old 09-28-2015, 02:30 PM   #8
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Thanks for that, sonftsynth.
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Old 09-28-2015, 04:09 PM   #9
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Mmmmm... just watched a video on youtube (from some guy with a wicked sense of humour) about the correct way to apply thermal paste.
Think I might have found my problem.
I know that when I built this machine (middle of last year), I DID in fact spread the paste with my finger, which apparently is just about the worst thing you could do. Best approach is to simply put a pea-sized dollop right in the centre of the CPU and allow the downward pressure of the heatsink to spread the paste evenly. This has the added advantage of pushing any air outwards at the same time, so no air gets trapped between the CPU and the heatsink.
So, tonight when I get home, I'm going to pull the machine apart, reapply the thermal paste (properly, this time!), de-fluff the fins of the heatsink, and see if things don't improve.
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Old 09-28-2015, 04:12 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by audio2u View Post
Mmmmm... just watched a video on youtube (from some guy with a wicked sense of humour) about the correct way to apply thermal paste.
Think I might have found my problem.
I know that when I built this machine (middle of last year), I DID in fact spread the paste with my finger, which apparently is just about the worst thing you could do. Best approach is to simply put a pea-sized dollop right in the centre of the CPU and allow the downward pressure of the heatsink to spread the paste evenly. This has the added advantage of pushing any air outwards at the same time, so no air gets trapped between the CPU and the heatsink.
So, tonight when I get home, I'm going to pull the machine apart, reapply the thermal paste (properly, this time!), de-fluff the fins of the heatsink, and see if things don't improve.
Things should improve big time. However a tower cooler should be night and day better still.
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Old 09-28-2015, 04:14 PM   #11
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I'll keep that in mind, softsynth. Thanks!
If this fix gets me through this project, I'll consider the heatsink upgrade then (in a ocuple of weeks time).
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Old 09-28-2015, 05:58 PM   #12
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That Evo heatsink is pretty much the most popular heatsink among PC enthusiasts because it is really inexpensive for its performance. Just a heads up though, it is huge.
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Old 09-29-2015, 04:22 AM   #13
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I use 212 Evo, I was highly impressed by the improvement over standard Intel cooler.
Much quieter and much cooler. Even on repeated maximum stress tests it remains running quietly (with the Stock Intel speed would increase audibly) and produces very little extra heat.
I used it on Core 2 quad and also used it on the current i5 quad.

I have a fairly narrow/small size case (with good airflow) and it is a close fit with the door fitted. Nonetheless I have noise damping pads fitted to all panels too, helping to make a quiet PC.
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Old 09-29-2015, 04:54 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Softsynth View Post
....I have noise damping pads fitted to all panels too, helping to make a quiet PC.
Oooh! Do tell more.
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Old 09-29-2015, 07:54 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by audio2u View Post
Oooh! Do tell more.
Not much to tell really. I haven't gone overboard trying to kill all noise. I just wanted a much quieter PC without making any concession in terms of power.

In my own PC I applied el cheapo Akasa damping pads, on all panels: top, bottom and sides and made rolls to stuff in empty drive bay spaces.
These work on high frequencies reasonably well for fairly thin affordable pads. You can do much better, at a price.

The main efforts (and my tips) to kill noise were:
1) In the choice of heatsink fan (as discussed) then maximum fan speed set in BIOS (after stress tests).
2) Choice of PSU. I use a Seasonic Gold PSU which has a quality fan that does not have to work hard, it can even be turned off.
3) Damping pads - cheap Akasa pads DO work, but expect only reduction in HF noise. They do nothing for low/mid frequency rumbles.
4) SSDs fitted. Fast and noiseless.
5) Graphics card with nice quiet dual fans and large exposed heatsink with heat pipes. The better alternative for low noise is obviously a low power fan-less graphics card, however those restrict your options.
6) Stick to a solidly built, small-ish steel case. Cheap cases buzz and rattle, and radiate noise effectively, especially if you still have optical drives. Small panel area, heavy panels best.
7) Careful routing of cables to assist airflow. Unused cables removed (modular PSU).
8) Large 120mm fans fitted to top and bottom, size of ventilation holes increased on various panels. Fan speed set low in BIOS. Low temperatures observed.



Various methods to reduce PC noise discussed here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quiet_PC

Last edited by Softsynth; 09-29-2015 at 08:08 AM.
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Old 09-29-2015, 01:34 PM   #16
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Awesome! Thanks mate. I shall investigate.
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