Old 03-23-2010, 08:29 AM   #41
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I like Antress SeventhSign as vintage style vocal comp. Compared to something like Density Mk.II it is more "lo-fi" in a good way. It is worth a try. Also his older Fairchild comp is sometimes useful for drums and bass. I usually use LostAngel for DI bass and then some other comp like TLs-3127 after it.

For delays I use free TAL delays and GSi's WatKat and also his Space Echo emulation (which isn't free).

Convolution verbs will give you good results, as long as you got right impulses. That free Bricasti pack has good plates and especially great chamber called "old chamber" that is instant vintage. Also rooms are nice. I also have some spring verb impulses that work surprisingly well (with bojojoing and all).

But if you have Nebula then I urge you to buy Nextaz EMT140 plate programs. They are cheap and they sound stellar. It has that old organic plate sound. There are also some good free spring verbs for Nebula.
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Old 03-23-2010, 07:15 PM   #42
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You should bounce all the stems to a cassette deck and mix that. The analogue tape sound from yesteryear is the low-fi cassette sound because that is what we heard at the consumer level. In the old days you would have to have the absolute best equipment during the entire production chain because every thing you did added distortion to the signal. The lower grade of analogue that tape decks produce can be fixed with digital plugins because it doesn't degrade the sound any further. And using digital plugins after you bounced to tape still sounds like analogue. Once you sprinkle magic fairy dust(iron oxide) on the sound its analogue forever. Changing the record levels and bias will give you different kinds of compression, saturation, distortion, low end boost and high frequency roll off. And you get wow and flutter which is a very underrated feature that contributes to the magic of tape. In this way you are using the tape deck as an effects box. It changes the way you mix ITB.
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Old 03-23-2010, 09:24 PM   #43
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You're recording each track separately to cassette tape and then re-importing it to your DAW? I've always wanted to try that! Do you have to do a lot of nipping and tucking to keep things in sync?
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Old 03-23-2010, 11:07 PM   #44
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He said bounce stems...bouncing separate tracks is liable to be a bit much. If you have a three head machine sync won't be an issue.
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Old 03-24-2010, 04:12 AM   #45
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This is starting to sound more and more like a science project instead of a recording
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Old 03-24-2010, 05:29 AM   #46
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Which open source kit are you using ?
The Open Source Drum Kit.

Here's a short clip of the drums in action, completely unprocessed. I've replaced the default kick and snare with the ones in The Real Snare Drum package (wow, these guys come up with the most imaginative names) from the same site. I think these samples will fit the style quite well.
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Old 03-24-2010, 11:57 AM   #47
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I can't see where to actually download the OS Drum Kit.
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Old 03-24-2010, 12:13 PM   #48
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I can't see where to actually download the OS Drum Kit.
You're right, I can't find any d/l link either. Weird. I got the link from a KVR thread, you can get the kit here.
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Old 03-24-2010, 12:41 PM   #49
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Thanks! Now, I have to choose something that will play sfz files, any recommendations?

(On a side note, I'd really like a General Midi vsti but I can't find one. I have lots of midi tunes but need something better than my soundcard to play them. NTM, when I take them to another PC they sound different.)
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Old 03-25-2010, 06:39 AM   #50
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A short first attempt at capturing the right sound. I know, this is probably turning out a lot poppier than some of you expected, but I don't want to attempt something completely over the top right now because I know I will never finish it. Anyhoo, this is VERY VERY sketchy. Frankly, it feels like I have no idea what I'm doing. It's likely a very bad idea worrying about the right "sound" at this point, I should really finish the song first.

JHughes: I use sfz player for, uh, playing sfz's.
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Old 03-25-2010, 08:21 AM   #51
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cerendir that sounds great! I'd say you're definitely on the the right track to capturing the 70s sound. It sounds just like classic Styx!

Although I haven't done any mixing with the intent of getting a 70s sound, I do a lot of keyboard / patch programming to get those kinds of sounds... one thing I usually do is to limit myself to only using plate reverbs, I think that was pretty much the standard way of getting reverb back then... I have no idea if this really makes sense but to me it keeps the reverb sounding "old"

P.S. For organs, you might want to check out GSi's VB3 plugin, it's only about $60 and it's a fantastic B3 simulator with awesome Leslie and overdrive.
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Old 03-25-2010, 08:48 AM   #52
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not hard really. dead drums in a small, dead room, close mic'd, evans hydralic heads or remo black dots. don't have real drums? sample some off an al green record. otherwise IF you must, find the dryest kit of the sample kits you have and use a transient designer to to cut the sustain down. and don't use the room mics.

keys? just the classics. good ole piano, b3, wurlitzer & rhodes (played through a fender twin), mellotron, cheezball fake strings, maybe some crappy, annoying monophonic synth. i.e "wish you were here," or steve miller band.

bass? 4 strings only. no 5's, just a p-bass, jazz bass or maybe a rick.

geetars? no pointy headstocks, no high gain, no chorus, but maybe add a craptastic big muff fuzz pedal.

vocals? sing in tune without a plugin to do it for you

fx? setup 1 plate reverb, 1 slapback delay, and 1 long delay, and ONLY use those via channel sends.

a big pile of cocaine and/or heroin helps too.
Wow, yeah...this is the formula. but make that slapback on a 1/4" otari 5050!
and if anyone can point me in the direction of a plug-in that emulates the sound of a studer A80 running ampex 456@+3 15IPS no Dolby, I'd be forever in your debt.
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Old 03-25-2010, 01:50 PM   #53
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Cool idea! Man, I love the old prog stuff. I was actually listening to Selling England by the Pound while reading this thread...

First and foremost, you need the SONG and ARRANGEMENT. The great prog bands were MASTER arrangers. Pick a few favorite tunes and just write out arrangement notes... what instruments when, keys and time signatures (if needed), comments on dynamics and mood shifts, complete lyrics, etc. You can learn a lot about how they were put together that way. Then do your composing along those models. I'd start with something small and contained - compare Yes' "Siberian Khatru", or King Crimson's "Epitaph", or somesuch. Don't try to write "Supper's Ready" right out of the gate!

Second, compose within your own chops and abilities. Check out the Flaming Lips album "The Soft Bulletin" for great ideas there. They aren't huge chops players, but they got the prog feel (and modernized it).

Now for production stuff, here are a bunch of ideas, many of which have already been mentioned:
1. Use only plate or chamber reverbs. I'd be a little more generous here and allow a tiny amount of room reverb on individual tracks, but just put a plate or a chamber on a send and make all the instruments share it.
2. Extensive use of mono and hard panning. Don't record instruments in stereo, generally.
3. Use characteristic instruments of the time... mellotrons and organs, dry thuddy toms, fuzz pedals.
4. Since you're relying on sampled drums, try adding live hand percussion for a more live feel.
5. Make a "desk". Use ONLY a single, "character" eq on every track. If it can't be done with something like Stillwell 1973, you live without. Compressors should be on busses and shared, and not many of 'em.
6. Limit the track count on your "desk" to 24, max. If you need more, render a submix and then delete the originals (you'll want to do this right away with the drums). Make commitments!
7. Don't ever edit timing on a track. If you can't play it perfectly, live with the imperfection.

I actually do a lot of this stuff as regular practice. I very nearly switched from Reaper to Propellerhead Record just for its forced traditional mixing desk and no-vst limitations. Ultimately, I stayed with Reaper largely because Record can't touch my NI B4 organ or Redline Reverb...
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Old 03-25-2010, 02:00 PM   #54
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I don't know about the idea of bouncing to cassette.

Just because people listened on cassette a lot doesn't mean that the source material sounded like cassette tapes.

For organ sounds I like the free Proteus VX (or the full Proteus X).
Play with the mod wheel, they have leslie and distortion programmed into some of the sounds.
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Old 03-25-2010, 04:56 PM   #55
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all i can recount is my own experiences.
i'm sure many will disagree with me..but..
here goes. lol.
what ive found is useing "todays modern gear" that is so low noise,
with every manufacturer trying to outdo the other spec wise ,
that its darn difficult cos even the cheap mic pre's n ADA
these days is so clean.
really really listen to those old records of the 60's n 70's.
(youll hear often mic pre distortion on the vocs for example..
which AE's tried to eq around.)
part of it i would argue is the recording gear used at the time,
as well as often superb AE's who knew how to get round problems.
and use outboard to "mask" imperfections.
an example..n ive done this many times for fun.
cos i enjoy doin vocs , last week i was curious if i could get the vibe
of a old vocal. tried one of my diy mic pre's..nope..too dam clean.
so i turned to a crusty mic pre in a cassette dek.
got closer. just used a 57.
in summary its darn difficult cos gear today is different.
i bet even if the original players of a classic hit were re recorded
today with their original instruments , it wouldnt sound the same cos of modern gear used. heck i can remember seeing live in the 70's classic hit artists n the songs didnt sound the same live as in the studio.
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Old 03-26-2010, 07:25 AM   #56
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Oh and for recording, buy some very old and cheap mics! They are instant vintage.
Inspired by this suggestion, I paid a visit to a couple of local thrift stores and managed to find this little fella:



According to the label it's a "MD-102", the brand name appears to be "TEN". It's likely not intended for music recording (looks like something from an old portable tape recorder maybe?), but it might come in handy at some point. I haven't had time to record anything with it yet, but it works. And it smells strongly of old man's cologne. Ugh.
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Old 03-26-2010, 09:47 AM   #57
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I'm really grateful for all the technical tips I'm getting, as always I'm awed and humbled by the sheer amount of knowledge in this community. I'd like to tap into that pool of knowledge even more with a few questions for people with more knowledge than me of vintage gear and recording techniques:

1. Most if not all emulations of vintage analog synths feature built-in delay effects. Is this something that was commonly present in the hardware or has it been tacked on to make the virtual synths sound more spacious and impressive?

2. Drum compression. I'm not quite sure to go about it to get the desired sound. I really love a lot of the 70s drum sounds because they have a lot of detail, especially on the snare. You can really hear all those tickety-tickety ghost notes happening. I'm guessing compression comes into play here, but I don't know if it was common to use compressors on separate kit pieces. Should I aim for full kit compression only, or add a comp on strategic pieces as well, like the snare?

3. The Antress Fairchild clone makes absolutely no sense to me. I'm not good with compressors to begin with, and presented with a set of unorthodox parameters like that, I'm mostly just scratching my head and twisting knobs at random. Anyone have any tips on how to use it properly?

4. Tape saturation is bascially a cumulative effect, right? Meaning, just smacking a tape saturation plug on the master will not yield the same result as using it on every track? It stands to reason that this is so, seeing as how the saturation happens when an individual track is recorded to tape, I just want to check that my thinking is right.

5. Here's a wild thought. I don't have a guitar amp anymore (haven't played in a band for ages), I always just D/I my Zoom preamp and add a cab sim (Voxengo Boogex) with some nice IR after the fact. While this works quite well for more modern guitar sounds, it's hard faking more roomy vintage tones with that approach. So I was thinking... what if I would stick a mic in front of one of my monitors and treat it like it was an actual speaker cab? I know it would work, technically, but would it be worth the hassle?

I believe technogremlin is right, this *is* turning into a science project. But that's part of the fun IMO.
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Old 03-26-2010, 11:14 AM   #58
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2. Drum compression. I'm not quite sure to go about it to get the desired sound. I really love a lot of the 70s drum sounds because they have a lot of detail, especially on the snare. You can really hear all those tickety-tickety ghost notes happening. I'm guessing compression comes into play here, but I don't know if it was common to use compressors on separate kit pieces. Should I aim for full kit compression only, or add a comp on strategic pieces as well, like the snare?

3. The Antress Fairchild clone makes absolutely no sense to me. I'm not good with compressors to begin with, and presented with a set of unorthodox parameters like that, I'm mostly just scratching my head and twisting knobs at random. Anyone have any tips on how to use it properly?

4. Tape saturation is bascially a cumulative effect, right? Meaning, just smacking a tape saturation plug on the master will not yield the same result as using it on every track? It stands to reason that this is so, seeing as how the saturation happens when an individual track is recorded to tape, I just want to check that my thinking is right.

5. Here's a wild thought. I don't have a guitar amp anymore (haven't played in a band for ages), I always just D/I my Zoom preamp and add a cab sim (Voxengo Boogex) with some nice IR after the fact. While this works quite well for more modern guitar sounds, it's hard faking more roomy vintage tones with that approach. So I was thinking... what if I would stick a mic in front of one of my monitors and treat it like it was an actual speaker cab? I know it would work, technically, but would it be worth the hassle?

I believe technogremlin is right, this *is* turning into a science project. But that's part of the fun IMO.
2. Compress certain things individually, then parallel compress the drum mix.

3. use your ears. it takes a while to be able to hear compression, so if you really exaggerate it at first while playing with the settings, it should sink in. then you can back it off.

4. yes, correct. a wee bit on every track, then again on the master

5. re-amping using a monitor? sure, why not? let us know how it turns out.
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Old 03-26-2010, 12:44 PM   #59
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1. Most if not all emulations of vintage analog synths feature built-in delay effects. Is this something that was commonly present in the hardware or has it been tacked on to make the virtual synths sound more spacious and impressive?
I have owned several vintage synths and keyboards back in the days and NONE of them had any onboard delays or reverbs. Early stuff had no real effects at all, my Teisco 110F had an EQ which I found pretty special at the time. After that came the event of onboard chorus and flangers. I had a Siel Orchestra II that had a wonderfull flanger, I still have to find a plugin that can do that specific sound.

Onboard delays and reverbs came around late eighties I think (with the big workstation synths). Next to NubiLE for organ sounds and something for a fender rhodes emu just use the stuff that is in the Elektrostudio package and you have the right sounding synths and keyboards right there.

Quote:
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I believe technogremlin is right, this *is* turning into a science project. But that's part of the fun IMO.
Don't make me say 'I told you so'
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Old 03-26-2010, 01:50 PM   #60
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Hey, nice sounding stuff already, Cerendir! I believe you can make this work rather well.

About Antress Fairchild, you are talking the latest version, Fire Chainer? It has few "factory" set attack and release values that you can choose from the knob. Values themselves read on the GUI. Also Bootsie's Density Mk.II has this similar approach. I personally use more his older black skinned version that had dedicated knobs for attack and release. It is little funky but has nice not so usual attack and release curves that can be useful. Truth to be told I haven't used it much lately..

Also if you are using SeventhSign, you should notice that attack and release speeds work backwards. Highest value in the far right is the fastest.

Apart from using your ears you can also use some oscilloscope plugin to really see what compressor is doing to the waveform, especially to transient peaks. I use smartelectronix s(m)exoscope for that but I've been demoing Schwa's Schope and I will probably buy it, as it is just so nice all-in-one type solution. And using different comps in serial can also do wonders. And also you can use some limiter to chop off excessive sharp peaks if they bother you.

About saturation, when you use it as an fx, it is very useful on individual tracks but also on drums+bass sub channel (put them both under the same parent folder), for example. Just think of it like multitrack record, they used to record individual tracks on red, not just master. And not all sounds like tape saturation. At least my vocals can get tubby and "dead" with it.

Easiest way to get decent roomy guitars out of ampsims, for me at least is to use some special impulses that have done further from the amp, thus having that room tone in them. I have couple of free ones that work quite well. They are from noisevault etc. so if you are interested, PM me.
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Old 03-26-2010, 01:54 PM   #61
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I have owned several vintage synths and keyboards back in the days and NONE of them had any onboard delays or reverbs. Early stuff had no real effects at all, my Teisco 110F had an EQ which I found pretty special at the time.
That's what I thought. Because if delay effects were that common on vintage analogs, it would be more prominent in recordings - which it isn't. On many albums (Rush stuff, for example), the analog synths are in general very dry.
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Old 03-26-2010, 11:35 PM   #62
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On many albums (Rush stuff, for example), the analog synths are in general very dry.
Ooooh, I'm a BIG Rush fan... and you are indeed right about that. The Rupert Hine albums Immunity, Waving not Drowning and The Wildest Wish to Fly are also great examples of that direct and dry synth sound production (and a very big inspiration for me both musically and production-wise).
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Old 03-28-2010, 06:41 PM   #63
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For bouncing back into the computer I just do it by aligning the original with the copy as best I can. I use a tascam 122 mkiii and that thing is precise. I have heard of people having problems with alignment with cheaper tape decks but you can fix that I think with reaper time audio quantizer or maybe use ableton. Someone mentioned something about the source material not sounding like cassette. This is true it sounded like 30ips reel to reel on every track and then bounced to reel to reel during mixdown. It was mastered and bounced to tape again - a master cassette or another reel to reel. This is why every stem has to be bounced to tape to emulate that. Digital is a step clearer than reel to reel so you can afford to degrade the sound a little more and there shouldn't be much of a difference. Also the width of the tape is so thin and going so slow you really need to devote one sound each to a track. Here is an example on gearslutz.

http://www.gearslutz.com/board/low-e...-revealed.html

As you will hear the tape just smooths out the brittleness of digital. You just can't get plugins to sound like that. Or you might get it to sound like it but you won't be able to get it to feel like it. I'll might show some personal examples when I get access to my old hard drive or I will make a new example with a song that was made on this board that I am in the process of mixing.
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Old 03-29-2010, 04:16 AM   #64
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3. The Antress Fairchild clone makes absolutely no sense to me. I'm not good with compressors to begin with, and presented with a set of unorthodox parameters like that, I'm mostly just scratching my head and twisting knobs at random. Anyone have any tips on how to use it properly?
Well I don't know about using it properly But I've found the fairchild clones work very good on drums. I use the T-racks 670 which is different to the Firechainer, ( the firechainer doesn't seem to have the Lat/Vert setting )
but it does sound very similar as i just tried an A/B comparison and was very surprised at the similarities between them.

I mainly use it ( the TR 670 ) for doing parrallel compression on drums, it seems to have the effect of making the drums sound wider, and generally just a bigger sound, but still mannages to get a focused punch to the Kick & snare, if that makes sense ?
The firechainer seems to get a very similar result.

Try it for yourself, Set the FC to comp, the time constant to 3 and just play with the threshold & inputgain till is sounds good ( i usually hit the comp pretty hard for parrallel compression ) then blend it in with the rest of the drums, and feel the smile on your face

Sorry i couldn't give a more technical explanation but i just don't have one to give

HTH

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Old 03-29-2010, 02:47 PM   #65
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This is starting to sound more and more like a science project instead of a recording
A lot of 1970s prog sounds more like a science project than a recording...
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Old 01-30-2015, 02:55 AM   #66
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Bump for a great thread!

What about recording and mixing acoustic guitars in the 70's way, any tips?
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Old 02-01-2015, 02:39 AM   #67
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Wow, I had almost forgotten about this thread
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Old 02-01-2015, 02:45 AM   #68
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It's a great one!!
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Old 02-16-2015, 01:57 PM   #69
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From what I can remember of recordings, and looking over dad's shoulder, there are some points to consider:
  • Acoustic pickup systems were in their infancy. Barcus-Berry had just carried over some of their technology from stand-up bass to the guitar; some were still using piezo elements with adhesive backing. For the most part, it was mic like a fiend, then pray for no leakage from the rest of the room.
  • Pencil-format condensers are your friend... or your enemy. Mic position has as much to do with staying out of the guitarist's way as getting good sound. One hand strumming madly like Richie Havens could smack it out of alignment.
  • So many good recordings used a dynamic mic with a little EQ. I was actually in the studio when dad whipped out an ElectroVoice RE-20. For those unfamiliar, it's a big fat dynamic developed for radio announcing, and jumped on in the recording world for kick drums and bass amps. I thought, "no way!", but it worked.
  • No one was afraid to use compression, but for different reasons than might be assumed. Many times it's to keep a loud instrument from overloading the inputs; for acoustic, it's to keep some of the string attack subtleties from washing out over a big dreadnought body "bloom". Try some multi-band compression, and see if the lower end response backs down a bit.

Other than that, you don't always need a big dreadnought body to get decent tone. Try a parlour-sized guitar, which is maybe a 3/4 size.

1970s production was not as romantic as some make it out to be. Most of the time, you were fighting against 1950's and 1960's equipment that was near the end of its' service life. You had to really have some big onions to get things to work, or get all McGuyver with stuff, and use them off-book for unintended purposes.

Acoustic guitars have not changed character over the years, except for the pickup systems that brought out more of the top end "sparkle". Some find pickups too 'brittle' sounding, but grin and bear it for a live gig.
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Old 02-16-2015, 02:01 PM   #70
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Bump for a great thread!

What about recording and mixing acoustic guitars in the 70's way, any tips?
Record two tracks, one with a cheap magnetic sound hole PU and the other with a dynamic, SM57/58/whatever and attempt to EQ these to sound like a guitar (failing is part of the idea !), using a Pultec- or similar EQ, not a modern one - that should get you in the ballpark.
If you want to get sophisticated, try a ribbon mic @ 1 ft or whatever, and/or maybe double with another guitar in Nashville tuning (the additional strings from a 12 string set, i.e. regular high E & B, G to low E octave strings), very popular (not only) back then.

All that generalizing aside, there are some very nicely recorded acoustics from that era too, I was referring to the others.
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Old 02-16-2015, 02:03 PM   #71
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good post, ginormous !
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Old 03-03-2015, 10:52 AM   #72
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For one thing, you may potentially be missing most important points.

In the 70s there was no Facebook, no YT, no 60" TVs, no DAW. If you wanted entertainment, you mostly had to go out. So there was huge difference between supply/demand for live gigs then and now. Recording was more about band that played live zillions gigs together than bedroom one-man-can-program-every-instrument-in-his-smartphone.

Also, average club didn't have more than 3 working mics so if drummer wanted to be heard through amplified guitars, he had to smash the drums.

There are no plugins to emulate those.
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Old 03-03-2015, 11:21 AM   #73
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... Recording was more about band that played live zillions gigs together than bedroom one-man-can-program-every-instrument-in-his-smartphone.
...
that is not completely correct. what about Beatles, Pink Floyd, Rolling Stones, Who, Kinks, Led Zeppelin who didnt tour that much as later Queen for example. the Beatles didnt gig at all in the last 4-5 years of their existence.

and for the distraction ... you didnt live in the 70s, did you? there were lots of distractions ... you dont know the girls from the 70s.

recording in the 70s was for bands of whon a record company thought they could get rich with them. no artistic thinking involved.
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Old 03-03-2015, 12:11 PM   #74
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Recording was more about band that played live zillions gigs together than bedroom one-man-can-program-every-instrument-in-his-smartphone..
What about Mike Oldfield maybe?
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Old 03-03-2015, 01:49 PM   #75
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Well, Mike Oldfield is not necessarily the first name coming through my mind when someone asks about sound of 70s...

No, I didn't live through 70s but read quite a lot of biographies and there is some interesting stuff on YT.

Most of the bands I link to 70s in my head contributed their fair share at the back of the van wearing off their a**s in working man clubs BEFORE they got a chance to even smell recording studio.

What about The Beatles you mentioned -- in Hamburg? How many nights played together just there? And I mean Nights -- not 3 sets @ 45 mins!
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Old 03-03-2015, 03:25 PM   #76
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...
What about The Beatles you mentioned -- in Hamburg? How many nights played together just there? And I mean Nights -- not 3 sets @ 45 mins!
in Hamburg that were the Silver Beatles (= quite good rock-n-roll band with almost an all-cover repertoire, have you heard the album from the Star Club? forget it.) and they played 6 sets @ 1 hour.

I was talking about the real Beatles from Revolver (included) on until the Rooftop Concert. they didnt play live. and for the other bands: do you really think a 70s big-shot rock band would have sounded live nearly listenable? do you know what they called a PA in 70s? you would laugh your ass off ... so when the big shots played live they werent able to reproduce the studio work. at least it didnt sound like that.

and they ass-off-playing in small clubs before the record deal didnt benefit there playing in the studio, because of the uncontrollable live-situation. if you listen to Beatles in Star Club and their first recordings you know what I mean. that has nothing to do with one another. every artist coming from live must learn how to record. complete different beast. I did and do both since 1972.

and oh yeah, Mike Oldfield (Tubular Bells) is 70s and comes to mind when 70s are talked.

I think that you mystify the 70s a little bit??? the 70s-reality is slightly different than the stories that are told. (not to mention the hairstyles, the clothes, the fragrances, and all the music, that was such a big bullshit except that music that has survived until today. the rest is forgotten, what a luck. look at 70s charts and try to find the songs listed amongst the top20 and listen to them. maybe you see the 70s in a different light then.)

(I am feeling old when I read what I wrote ... < good song title. dont take it, its mine. )
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Old 03-03-2015, 07:54 PM   #77
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I think that you mystify the 70s a little bit??? the 70s-reality is slightly different than the stories that are told. (not to mention the hairstyles, the clothes, the fragrances, and all the music, that was such a big bullshit except that music that has survived until today. the rest is forgotten, what a luck. look at 70s charts and try to find the songs listed amongst the top20 and listen to them. maybe you see the 70s in a different light then.)

(I am feeling old when I read what I wrote ... < good song title. dont take it, its mine. )
sometimes the past is looked at through rose colored glass. One thing I remember from the 70's is the radio stations going down the toilet in their attempts to pander to their growing, and working, audiences. Top 40 radio of the 60's morphed into album FM of the 70's, and then began to kill itself just slightly before MTV came in to finish the job. After that, everything changed.

Edit to add: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...s_of_the_1970s

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Old 03-04-2015, 12:39 AM   #78
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That brings back memories
Good and bad
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Old 03-04-2015, 04:11 AM   #79
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Excellent, there's hope for mankind! I had dem 70's charts always pictured FAR worse! But actually there's very little poor stuff, the kind of songs that nobody is able to write anymore (except me) .
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Old 03-05-2015, 09:52 AM   #80
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One thing I remember from the 70's is the radio stations going down the toilet
I think there were early 70s when radio stations went commercial in the UK, after 'pirates' era. That seemed to influence music business...
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