Old 07-15-2019, 03:57 AM   #1
Burnsjethro
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Help please.

My computer often struggles to keep up with my work in Reaper, particularly when I add fxs, etc.

My "music) computer has Word 10 installed, upgraded from an earlier version. I asked the computer shop if my computer could accommodate more memory. My present memory is: in use (compressed) 2.0 GB (63.1 MB)
Committed 2.4/5.4 GB cached 2.0 GB).

The technician said "It seems that your PC is already at its maximum memory. (4GB)".


I had a fellow, who is more computer-savvy than me, have a look at the machine.


One thing I am doing wrong, he said was keeping all my projects on an external disk then opening them up in Reaper on my computer. I should save the projects on my computer (I was saving projects externally 1) in case there should be a problem with the computer, 2) to save space on my internal hard drive (I only use it for recording music in Reaper but it is already pretty full, although I don't have that many plug-ins and so on and I thought Reaper was not a big space user!). Anyhow, he suggested I ask the computer people to install a SSD drive internally on my computer, so I could use this to store my projects but open them up in Reaper on my internal C drive. He says this would speed things up considerably.


Do you agree, is this feasible, otherwise do you have any other suggestions, apart from transferring everything lock, stock and barrel to my "work" computer (in use 4.7 GB – committed 6.2/13.1 GB, and although I don't really understand this, there is also a SDD drive installed).
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Old 07-15-2019, 09:08 AM   #2
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In your post you said you're running Word 10, upgraded from an earlier version, I'm assuming you meant Windows 10.

That being said, the 4 Gb RAM max is correct if your version of Windows is 32 bit. 64 bit Windows will address up to 128Gb of RAM, so it depends on which version you're running.

Yes, generally speaking, having your Reaper project files and data on a separate internal SSD will provide a bit of a performance boost over having them on an external drive. Has to do with throughput.

One last thing, you may be experiencing some performance issues if you "upgraded" an older version of Windows rather than doing a clean install of Windows. Sometimes, a lot of the bloat accumulated over time on your earlier version of Windows can impact the performance of your system when you simply upgrade rather than doing a clean install.

Start small, confirm your version of Windows. If it's 64 bit, you can add more RAM, that might help a little, then you can start looking at a separate internal drive for your Reaper data. Notice I said separate drive for the data, don't put your data on the same drive that holds your OS.

Good Luck.
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Old 07-15-2019, 09:28 AM   #3
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"In your post you said you're running Word 10, upgraded from an earlier version, I'm assuming you meant Windows 10."


Thanks for getting back. Sorry, yes I meant Windows 10.

"That being said, the 4 Gb RAM max is correct if your version of Windows is 32 bit. 64 bit Windows will address up to 128Gb of RAM, so it depends on which version you're running"

No, it's 64 bits. The technician told me 4 GB was the maximum.


"Yes, generally speaking, having your Reaper project files and data on a separate internal SSD will provide a bit of a performance boost over having them on an external drive. Has to do with throughput. "

"A bit". Is it worth adding an SSD drive then?

One last thing, you may be experiencing some performance issues if you "upgraded" an older version of Windows rather than doing a clean install of Windows. Sometimes, a lot of the bloat accumulated over time on your earlier version of Windows can impact the performance of your system when you simply upgrade rather than doing a clean install.

I am not sure what he did. He told me he told me everything would be deleted if were to be upgraded.

"Start small, confirm your version of Windows. If it's 64 bit, you can add more RAM, that might help a little, then you can start looking at a separate internal drive for your Reaper data. Notice I said separate drive for the data, don't put your data on the same drive that holds your OS."


I am a bit confused here, because the person who looked at my computer on the weekend said to put a folder on my hard drive (C) to put my Reaper projects in. I have just had a look and lo and behold "Windows" is on my C drive so I suppose that is where my operating system is. Why not put my project files there and where should I be putting my project files then? And why would the technician say no more memory could be added?

Thanks a lot for this invaluable information
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Old 07-15-2019, 09:48 AM   #4
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Upgrading to a SSD is the most bang for the buck computer upgrade. The old spinning hard drive was the classic bottleneck. The SSD lets your computer actually perform to the rest of its ability.

Put your OS on the SSD. Use the free space as your high performance drive space for audio work. Use external USB connected drives for backup.

Having the Word word-processor app installed will not affect audio work ability. (You weren't genuinely calling Windows Word right? ) Assuming you're running Windows from the mention of your system hard drive being named "C".

The SSD is a solid (sorry) investment.
If you upgrade the computer later on, keep that SSD you already bought with you.

If 4GB ram is truly the max for that machine, it must be a 32 bit Core2Duo at most. Still can do a lot of audio work! Just don't leave your word-processor app and other things running while you work on audio.
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Old 07-15-2019, 09:52 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Burnsjethro View Post

I am a bit confused here, because the person who looked at my computer on the weekend said to put a folder on my hard drive (C) to put my Reaper projects in. I have just had a look and lo and behold "Windows" is on my C drive so I suppose that is where my operating system is. Why not put my project files there and where should I be putting my project files then? And why would the technician say no more memory could be added?

Thanks a lot for this invaluable information
Having your project files on the same drive as your OS is OK, in fact it's probably an improvement over using an external drive, but having your data, any data, on a separate drive will provide better performance because of how drive controllers work. When you have everything on one drive, you have one drive controller that's handling requests for everything, OS, programs, data, etc. When you split that load between two controllers, in this scenario, each drive has it's own dedicated controller, you don't bog down the controller dealing with OS and program related stuff with data requests, and vice versa, you don't bog down the controller handling data for OS and program related stuff. Gets into some real techie stuff, but it's generally considered best practices. It's also a lot easier to backup and restore data if it's on a separate drive.

As far as the RAM goes, as mentioned, if your version of Windows is 32 bit, then, generally speaking, 4G for RAM is all that it can handle. Once again, more techie stuff. If your version of Windows is 64 bit then it will handle up to 128G RAM. Go into your system settings and it will tell you whether your version of Windows is 32 or 64 bit.

EDIT: Sorry, just re read where you did confirm that your OS is 64 bit. As far as the tech who said 4G RAM was the max for 64 bit Windows, you might want to get another tech!

Last edited by toleolu; 07-15-2019 at 09:59 AM.
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Old 07-15-2019, 09:58 AM   #6
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The advice back with spinning HDD's was to use multiple drives and keep OS and data separate. The SSD is SUCH a big improvement that that advice no longer applies. Having everything (OS, apps, data) on a single SSD is a huge leap in performance vs multiple HDDs. And as mentioned, using an external drive connected by USB is extra extra slow!

You'll see some talk from MIDI instrument players that use multiple SSDs and keep their sample libraries on separate SSDs from their OS. Understand that this is a next level live performance setup.

An older 32 bit C2D machine with 4GB ram and a SSD should be able to let you record at least up to 40 channels of audio for tracking (depending on your interface of course). You'd be able to mix something with 100 tracks. Might just have to freeze a couple things along the way if they had some hungry plugins. You'd even be able to run live sound for a small 8 - 12 channel setup using modest plugins. Even 15 year old computers are still relevant for a lot of things.

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Old 07-15-2019, 10:06 AM   #7
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There are the specifications I found.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf COMPUTER SPECIFICATIONS.pdf (33.9 KB, 41 views)
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:09 AM   #8
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No, it's 64 bits. The technician told me 4 GB was the maximum.
That should only be the case if the motherboard only supports 4GB which is remotely possible if the machine is older. What's the motherboard model that you have? You can find it by typing System Information in the cortana search box:



You could the scanner here (the one on the right with the checkbox), it may give you good info automatically:

https://www.crucial.com/usa/en/systemscanner
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:10 AM   #9
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So you've actually got 8G of RAM, which, for now, is probably OK.

You said you now have a folder on your C: drive that contains your Reaper data, have you noticed any improvement with that?
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:12 AM   #10
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Thanks everybody for coming forward with this advice.
I never get anywhere near 40 tracks.


Two guitars, keyboards, two set of vocals, bass and lead guitar, drum loops, or drums provided by my drum pads, plus a delay and reverb track and the various fxs. That is generally the maximum.
And things soon start to get really buggy, so I have to turn off all the effects to be able to record with the buffer at 64 (using focusrite version 2)cy.
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:16 AM   #11
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Verify you're using ASIO..

Go in: Reaper Preferences, Audio->Device
Make sure Audio system says ASIO (if not, that's likely your problem)

Asio Driver should say something like: Focusrite USB ASIO.

The specs for your PC look good enough to be capable though, from what I can tell.
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:17 AM   #12
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Baseboard product is: 82A1
Baseboard version is: KBC version 06.21
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:18 AM   #13
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FYI, low latency buffer settings like 64 samples only apply if you are running live sound or doing live performance through the computer. Anytime you need to hear real life sounds along with the output of the computer with absolutely no lag.

If you are just recording and mixing, you're literally not monitoring real life + the computer's output and thus you're taxing the system for no reason. If you're just recording and mixing, set your block size to 512 or 1024 samples. Otherwise it will be like trying to drive in 1st gear on the freeway (for the shitty car analogy).
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:20 AM   #14
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Asio driver: focusrite USB Asio
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:22 AM   #15
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There are the specifications I found.
Jeeze...
Yeah um... You've got a fairly modern system there with 8GB ram and a modern generation 64 bit capable i5 CPU that's even pretty fast!

Do NOT return to whatever scam center computer shop is telling you you have 4GB ram and suggesting your computer specs are 15 years old!

What a bunch of... wow!

You should be able to run mixes with hundreds of tracks or mix a full live band on a live stage with such a machine. Put a SSD in it and get comfortable installing your OS yourself and making backups of your system and your stuff.
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:25 AM   #16
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"FYI, low latency buffer settings like 64 samples only apply if you are running live sound or doing live performance through the computer. Anytime you need to hear real life sounds along with the output of the computer with absolutely no lag.

If you are just recording and mixing, you're literally not monitoring real life + the computer's output and thus you're taxing the system for no reason. If you're just recording and mixing, set your block size to 512 or 1024 samples. Otherwise it will be like trying to drive in 1st gear on the freeway (for the shitty car analogy)".

What does "FYI" mean?
When I had the older focusrite, the latency setting shown in the right-hand corner was really quite high, abovewhat someone here said was the tolerable latency level. This was drastically improved with the more recent interface. I do mix (well, what I call mixing) in a higher buffer setting, but, for instance, if we try to play the keyboards in a higher setting, the delay between me pressing a key and the sound coming out of the computer or in my headphones is quite noticeable.
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:25 AM   #17
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Here's something easy you can check.

Down in the lower right hand corner of your screen, where the date and time and is displayed, there should be something that looks like a little up arrow. If you hover your cursor over it, it says "Show Hidden Icons". Click on that and see what all you have running in there. Those are things that are running in the background and one of the things you want to do is minimize as many of those start up programs as you can. Even though you may not see them doing anything on the screen, they still take up some computer resources.

The thing is, there is no "magic bullet" when it comes to computer performance. There are many variables and you really need to take on overall systems approach when trying to come up with the best configuration for what your specific needs are.

I've always found that the techs who really knew what they were doing did not talk in technical terms, they talked in terms of trying to understand what you, the user, were trying to do and what your expectations were. See if you can find somebody like that and see what they suggest.
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:37 AM   #18
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"FYI, low latency buffer settings like 64 samples only apply if you are running live sound or doing live performance through the computer. Anytime you need to hear real life sounds along with the output of the computer with absolutely no lag.

If you are just recording and mixing, you're literally not monitoring real life + the computer's output and thus you're taxing the system for no reason. If you're just recording and mixing, set your block size to 512 or 1024 samples. Otherwise it will be like trying to drive in 1st gear on the freeway (for the shitty car analogy)".

What does "FYI" mean?
When I had the older focusrite, the latency setting shown in the right-hand corner was really quite high, abovewhat someone here said was the tolerable latency level. This was drastically improved with the more recent interface. I do mix (well, what I call mixing) in a higher buffer setting, but, for instance, if we try to play the keyboards in a higher setting, the delay between me pressing a key and the sound coming out of the computer or in my headphones is quite noticeable.
OK, so you are doing some live performance here and there. (Like playing through a MIDI instrument plugin with a MIDI keyboard controller.)

You need to set the latency low to where you no longer perceive any lag for live performance like that. The CPU power you have left after that is what it is. For just mixing work however, set your latency to 512 or 1024 samples to free up the CPU for mixing duties.

FYI = for your information
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:37 AM   #19
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Thanks toleolu, but the arrow is not there on my "music" computer, although it is htere on my "work" one.
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:39 AM   #20
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OK, so you are doing some live performance here and there. (Like playing through a MIDI instrument plugin with a MIDI keyboard controller.)

You need to set the latency low to where you no longer perceive any lag for live performance like that. The CPU power you have left after that is what it is. For just mixing work however, set your latency to 512 or 1024 samples to free up the CPU for mixing duties.

FYI = for your information
Thanks Serr.

Well, that is all I do with my computer is recording me playing, singing,... in various overdubbing steps.
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:42 AM   #21
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"o you've actually got 8G of RAM, which, for now, is probably OK.

You said you now have a folder on your C: drive that contains your Reaper data, have you noticed any improvement with that? "

A bit of an improvement, not huge though, I don't think."
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:43 AM   #22
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Thanks very much all of you for your generous advice.
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:43 AM   #23
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Thanks toleolu, but the arrow is not there on my "music" computer, although it is htere on my "work" one.
On your music computer, instead of the up arrow, is there a bunch of little icons down there?
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:43 AM   #24
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Thanks Serr.

Well, that is all I do with my computer is recording me playing, singing,... in various overdubbing steps.
You should have a plenty powerful machine for that.
Get comfortable installing the OS yourself and managing your data - meaning, understand what backing up the stuff on your hard drive means.
There are some Windows experts on this forum that can help with Windows tweaks to make it behave.
That's the stuff that will show results.
A SSD is the only upgrade you need.
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Old 07-18-2019, 09:03 AM   #25
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You should have a plenty powerful machine for that.
Get comfortable installing the OS yourself and managing your data - meaning, understand what backing up the stuff on your hard drive means.
There are some Windows experts on this forum that can help with Windows tweaks to make it behave.
That's the stuff that will show results.
A SSD is the only upgrade you need.


Well another computer bloke (not the shop), who has done excellent work for me in the past but is often away from home (lives just around the corner) says he will install a SDD sata drive on my computer (the ones he recommends is Samsung 970 EVO PLUS M.2 500GB or WD Blue 3D NAND 500GB 2,5 inch, which is half the price of the Samsung, how come?).

He has done this before but never with a Windows 10 OS. So he is going to clone my C hard drive and transfer this to the SDD hard drive.

Does anyone have any tips towards this end please?

What kind of Windows tweaks were you thinking of, Serr?
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Old 07-18-2019, 09:43 AM   #26
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Well another computer bloke (not the shop), who has done excellent work for me in the past but is often away from home (lives just around the corner) says he will install a SDD sata drive on my computer (the ones he recommends is Samsung 970 EVO PLUS M.2 500GB or WD Blue 3D NAND 500GB 2,5 inch, which is half the price of the Samsung, how come?).

He has done this before but never with a Windows 10 OS. So he is going to clone my C hard drive and transfer this to the SDD hard drive.

Does anyone have any tips towards this end please?

What kind of Windows tweaks were you thinking of, Serr?
The logic board you have will dictate weather you need a SATA or M.2 connecting SSD. It's going to be one or the other.

OSX user here. My "tweaks" are to install OSX or Linux.
I've seen advice offered on the forum though and there are Windows users in here doing heavy lifting with their rigs.

On the hardware side - Any computer with functional electronics sporting an i7 generation CPU (including the i3 or i5 versions) and a SSD should be almost unstoppable for small or medium projects. Only some of the hungry instrument plugins, hundreds of tracks, or a heavy live sound (needing low latency) setup calls for a higher end machine (the likes of which are usually only bought by video guys).

When I see reports of stuff crapping out after just a few tracks and that kind of thing... Either a slow spinner hard drive is at play or you have other stuff running or something going on with your OS.
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Old 07-18-2019, 10:39 AM   #27
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Thanks Serr. I don't think I have anything else running when I am recording (I have turned off all the Windows items as recommeded by Focusrite).

I think it must be my hard drive, which says 23 gb free space from a total of 117 gb (I can't believe how full it is, given nearly everythin on it is Reaper-related and all my projects were stored on an external drive, up until a few days ago!
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Old 07-18-2019, 11:47 AM   #28
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OK, there's another clue. The drive being almost full like that = slow. On top of it being a slow HDD to begin with. And again with the expected low performance of an external USB connected drive.

A SSD will probably fix everything.
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Old 07-18-2019, 12:05 PM   #29
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Add in that the USB port on your PC, or your drive, or both could only be USB 2.x and that would make performance even more brutal.

FYI, I have an older generation version of the M.2 Samsung your "computer bloke" recommended, and it is wonderful. I'm sure you won't be unhappy with the other one either though.

If you had the space to move all Reaper related files off that external onto one of your internal drives (preferably your SSD, but you'll want plenty of space there for Windows to eat up) that might be a good test to help prove that's the issue.
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Old 07-18-2019, 12:15 PM   #30
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Add in that the USB port on your PC, or your drive, or both could only be USB 2.x and that would make performance even more brutal.

FYI, I have an older generation version of the M.2 Samsung your "computer bloke" recommended, and it is wonderful. I'm sure you won't be unhappy with the other one either though.

If you had the space to move all Reaper related files off that external onto one of your internal drives (preferably your SSD, but you'll want plenty of space there for Windows to eat up) that might be a good test to help prove that's the issue.

Thank you all for cheering me up no end.
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Old 07-19-2019, 08:08 AM   #31
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First setback. I sent my son to collect the SDD disk ( M.2 Samsung ), as recommended by the "computer bloke" and just as my son handed it over, the fellow e-mailed me to tell me he had made a mistake as my computer was too old for this disk, instead I should take the WD Blue 3D NAND 500GB 2,5 inch.
This is about half the price. He reckons it won't be any slower but may have a shorter lifespan. Any thoughts on this?
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Old 07-19-2019, 08:30 AM   #32
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First setback. I sent my son to collect the SDD disk ( M.2 Samsung ), as recommended by the "computer bloke" and just as my son handed it over, the fellow e-mailed me to tell me he had made a mistake as my computer was too old for this disk, instead I should take the WD Blue 3D NAND 500GB 2,5 inch.
This is about half the price. He reckons it won't be any slower but may have a shorter lifespan. Any thoughts on this?
That's what I was trying to point out above. Your logic board would only have one or the other (SATA or M.2). Only the high end machines aimed at video editors will have M.2 slots on the logic board.

And no your computer is not "too old"! It simply doesn't have the feature of an M.2 port on the logic board. "Too old" there is scammer talk. I'd never consider going back to wherever that is.

Don't go running out thinking you need to upgrade to M.2 either!
You would have been getting around 40MB/sec with your internal 5400rpm HDD.
Probably around 20MB/sec over the USB connection to the external.
(All worst case examples for discussion.)

A SSD connected to SATA2 will boost that up to 250MB/sec!
SATA3 (which you probably don't have) would be 500MB/sec.

You don't need to entertain going up to 1200MB/sec with an M.2
You'd never ever hit the max 250MB/sec with a SATA2 connected SSD with audio. You'd need to be editing 4k video before a M.2 drive made any sense.

Take a look at Crucial SSDs at B&H Photo Video
500GB for $60
1TB for $110
2TB on sale for $206

Crucial is one of the big flash chip makers like Samsung and these have 5 year warranty.

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Old 07-19-2019, 08:57 AM   #33
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That's what I was trying to point out above. Your logic board would only have one or the other (SATA or M.2). Only the high end machines aimed at video editors will have M.2 slots on the logic board.
Not sure what you mean here.. if I'm misunderstanding. Motherboards can definitely have both SATA and M.2 together (although definitely good advice that his mobo should have been verified to have an M.2 slot, of course).

I actually have an M.2 SSD, and several spinny SATA drives connected to mine. And these mobos aren't that expensive, really.. mine cost $220CAD (ASUS PRIME Z270-A), and that was for a pretty good one, at the time.. there's a lot cheaper ones out there. I do all sorts of things with my PC, from Audio, to video editing, to gaming, so that's why I bought this mobo. Anyways, doesn't help the OP here at all, but just was wondering what you meant, cause they can definitely have both.

(edit: under the assumption that this is a desktop PC, as the op didn't specify this was a laptop, but those of course have more limited space so you might only get one or the other in that case)

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Old 07-19-2019, 08:59 AM   #34
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Thanks very much for this information
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Old 07-19-2019, 09:36 AM   #35
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The WD Blue should be fine. At least some of the extra cost of the Samsung is likely due to overprovisioning, which is basically hiding some of the capacity to be used when other areas wear out. Samsung is (successfully) positioning themselves on the premium end of the SSD market.

Personally I wouldn't say that your guy is likely to be a scammer based on his mistake regarding M.2 vs SATA. Sounds like he might be an amateur / enthusiast, which makes the mistake more understandable than it would be coming from a pro.

I looked up "82A1 motherboard" and it looks like this is an HP desktop, is that correct? It might be worth having your guy look up adding more RAM, too, depending on your budget. 8GB is workable but 16GB is better, and according to the top 5 search results here, your computer can most likely accept it:
https://www.google.com/search?client...a1+motherboard
Go down to "Memory Upgrade Information" and note that it says "Supports up to 16 GB (unbuffered) on 64-bit computers"

I'd definitely prioritize the SSD, though - that'll make a huge difference.
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Old 07-19-2019, 09:58 AM   #36
Burnsjethro
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Thanks for that update. Yes, it is an HP desktop.
I used to use for my translation job but I bought a new one last year and thought I could upgrade the old one and use it solely for music, i.e. recording in Reaper.
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Old 07-19-2019, 10:04 AM   #37
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Thanks Reason. A bit of a relief to hear that . He's not a rank amateur and has helped me out a lot in the past with serious problems. Anyhow, I am passing these messages on to him as they are very useful.

I would be utterly incapable of doing the job myself!
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Old 08-07-2019, 01:13 AM   #38
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Sorry, subsequent to all your extremely helpful comments I forgot to update you on what happened to my computer. The computer engineer said that the ram was at the maximum permissible, given its age.

He also discovered that that the local disk (31.9 GB free of 117 GB ) is a SSD.

He added an internal 465-GB SDD, which is where I am now storing the projects I am working on. There is definitely an improvement. I don't suppose it would make much difference moving my Reaper program, lock, stock and barrel, to the new SDD, would it?
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Old 08-07-2019, 10:58 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burnsjethro View Post
I don't suppose it would make much difference moving my Reaper program, lock, stock and barrel, to the new SDD, would it?
If I understand you correctly, you've added an additional SSD to your computer so now basically you have a C: drive and D:, E:, or whatever drive letter it's designated as, and you put your project files on that new drive and still have your OS and programs on the original C: drive.

If that's correct, then basically you can't "move" programs from one drive to another, they have to be uninstalled, then reinstalled, making sure you change the default install location from the C: drive to whatever drive you want to put it on.

I suspect doing that will cause more problems than it's worth, plus you're back to the performance issue of one drive controller handling requests for both program and data.

If I misunderstood what you're asking here, please let me know what I'm missing.
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Old 08-07-2019, 11:14 AM   #40
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As far as your RAM situation, I tried like heck to dig up specs on your motherboard, but couldn't find them anywhere. But if your computer guy is saying 8GB is the max, it must be a limitation of your motherboard, vs. a limitation in Windows 64-bit (Which is significantly higher). So it sounds like 8GB it is, for you. That's too bad, because that's some lower hanging fruit when it comes to increasing performance.

The other thing I'd wonder is if you have a lot of "bloat" (unnecessary software) running in the background while Reaper is running. Did your computer guy look at that? Manufacturers like HP (which I believe is who makes your PC, is that right?), Compaq, Dell and others are notorious for their apps running rogue in the background. I can actually say, myself, I very oddly decided to buy a Dell laptop recently. I say "oddly" because I'm actually anti-Dell, but I wanted to give them another shot because I liked some of the other features. Anyways, it was slow as hell and hanging on me frequently until I completely purged the system of any Dell software. Now it runs great, 90+% of the time.

So, perhaps that is the next low hanging fruit, if your computer guy hasn't already tried. It's easy enough to go through a computer and purge off all the "bloat" (which could include HP software, but definitely not limited to just that).

Re: moving Reaper to another drive, agree with Toleolu.. probably won't make much of a difference. Probably wouldn't hurt to try, but you could also end up botching the process too though (so yeah, I guess it could hurt to try lol). Really I'd be most concerned about where your project and all the plugins reside. Should be on a fast, internal drive.

Last edited by cstooch; 08-07-2019 at 11:22 AM.
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