Old 03-24-2007, 09:32 PM   #1
dminoz
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Default analog to midi plugin: any such thing

Is there any sort of plugin which can take an analog signal (such as from an ordinary electric guitar), and convert that signal into midi data, and then pass that on to a vsti?

Is there any such thing?
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Old 03-24-2007, 09:40 PM   #2
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Yep, ReaTune,...its in there.

Search the forum for some tips.
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Old 03-24-2007, 09:54 PM   #3
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Great! Thanks.
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Old 03-24-2007, 10:04 PM   #4
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I was gonna suggest melodyne... but instead, i am gonna go play with ReaTune!

t.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Billoon View Post
Yep, ReaTune,...its in there.

Search the forum for some tips.
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Old 03-25-2007, 04:44 PM   #5
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well, I think that was an experiment that failed. I tried Reatune, and also a couple of other plugins from around the web that I found. I suppose I was hoping for the impossible, i.e. being able to translate fairly complex acoustic guitar parts into midi data, even to the point of creating chords. However, the translation procedures these plugins use seem to require analog data that is much more simple than I was hoping to be able to use. The end results are choppy, and not at all usable or musical. I'll try Melodyne, though, to see what's going on there.
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Old 03-25-2007, 04:49 PM   #6
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yeah, what you're asking for is pretty complex, and the technology is pretty new. While Reaper's implementation is quite nice, the technology is still in its infancy and can't handle complex parts.


tj
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Old 03-25-2007, 07:33 PM   #7
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Two options you have are to use single notes and enter them in the sequence you need them in, then use MIDI harmonizers to create chords. Not a straightforward process, but it can work to a certain degree.

Along the lines above there's this pitch-to-MIDI plugin for $25 that may do the trick:
http://www.cloneensemble.com/

As you'll see, there's a few other interesting plugins in there as well.

Ideally, you'd want to use a MIDI guitar. Yes, they're kinda pricey, but the Roland unit (which is the most advanced, I believe) supposedly tracks pretty well. There's also the Axon unit too:

http://tinyurl.com/2sf8d2

http://tinyurl.com/3bzrsd
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Old 03-25-2007, 07:49 PM   #8
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After a classical rehearsal the other day involving some passages for solo clarinet, during the lunch break I entertained those present by replacing the clarinet with a sax VSTi, via ReaTune. Impressed everyone but the clarinettist who was elsewhere...
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Old 03-26-2007, 08:25 AM   #9
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ha! cool, Art. Those clarinettists needs their ego bruised occasionally... they're so egotistical.

no wait... i was thinking of lead guitarists..
heh..


impressed them, huh? excellent. What sax VSTi were you using?


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Old 03-26-2007, 02:45 PM   #10
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Saxi! No time to find a link right now, but KvR or Google should help. Rather nice for free.
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Old 03-26-2007, 02:59 PM   #11
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Tallstick do a utility call TS-AudiotoMidi that does an OK job.

It lets you adjust various parameters (including the range of notes) and convert.

Guitars can often sound choppy. A lot depends on what instrument you want to play midi through.

It can be worth making a base with the guitar and then editing the midi (just look for long sequences of short notes and make them one long one). I also found that cutting everything that didn't fit with the instrument helped. e.g. Draw a marquee around the top half of the notes and just delete them if you are looking at a bassy instrument.

Playing with a VSTi like SFZ-X can help too. Load a decent soundfont and then play with the attack and release to see if you can get a more realistic sound.

I played a bit with all of this. Then went and got a keyboard
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