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Old 05-14-2021, 05:00 PM   #81
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You're right, alsa-firmware is not in the Ubuntu repositories. There is a lot of conflicting info out there.

This is it: https://github.com/alsa-project/alsa-firmware

(Click on "Code", then "Download ZIP" to get the files).

That emu folder should be in your /lib/firmware folder.

I still have no idea how this is loaded though. It seems like there is some sort of 'hotplug' loader that does it automatically, or you may still have to compile it yourself. Googling information about this is surprisingly difficult.
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Old 05-14-2021, 05:29 PM   #82
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^ OK, yeah, I ran into that yesterday but wasn't sure if I could use it... I've now downloaded it, googled for 'how to install', and landed on this page that seems to have some instructions:
https://www.linuxfromscratch.org/blf...-firmware.html

This page says it depends on alsa-tools 1.2.2, I have "alsa-tools 1.1.7-1ubuntu1" and Synaptic package manager lists that as being the latest version... Latest version for my Ubuntu install? Latest version anywhere??

Similarly, when I flip to the alsa-tools 1.2.2 page, it shows a dependency on an alsa library that I don't seem to have installed...

So it seems like I'm embarking on another manual package quest like yesterday with the network, maybe...

edit: FYI, that link above is actually part of an online book that appears to have a lot of information. It's called "Beyond Linux From Scratch," which is an extension of the book, "Linux from Scratch."


edit2: HEY! I think we're actually getting somewhere. I simply tried the install methods at that linked page above (ignored details, like dependencies), of the alsa-firmware, rebooted, and the emu card is now installed.

Not able to simply turn audio dock ON and have it activated, no sound* (that depends on the dock, there are no physical outputs on the 1010 card itself), but, I'll be trying to reboot with the dock on and see what happens.

Just seeing the card recognized/installed is seemingly miraculous at this point.

*[a bit later...] OK, switching ON the dock does activate it, we do have sound. At some point I disconnected the dock from the card and forgot to plug it back in.

So it does work to some extent. Now I have to figure out how to install and configure that alternative mixer linked in the webpage Glennbo posted way up there. Or just generally figure out what inputs and outputs work and how. At this point I do see the headphone jack isn't working, which is something people mentioned before...

Last edited by eq1; 05-14-2021 at 07:19 PM.
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Old 05-14-2021, 09:37 PM   #83
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A lot of that goes unmentioned in this or that instruction on how to do something, the knowledge is just assumed to be understood.
I know your pain. It's basically a byproduct of Linux having been built up by thousands of people (many volunteering) over many years, with many distros and many different organizations involved, so it's never going to be a simple "this is how it's done" one-size-fits all kind of thing. You kind of just wade in, start learning the terminology, start seeing patterns and picking tricks up here and there, and things gradually get easier.

There are books and other more thorough guides, of course, so if you get serious you can get in deeper. But from an end-user perspective it's a bit weird to get started. And don't forget that there is a similar amount of confusing stuff with Windows and we just take it for granted because most of us are or were more familiar with it. Windows is a bit more "centralized" in terms of documentation, but more obtuse in terms of what's happening behind the curtain, so it's a tradeoff.

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For example, it seems like, say, I not only need "ALSA-firmware," but I need ALSA-firmware from a 'download' meant for, I guess, Ubuntu 20.04 'focal'?? Is something like that the case, or not?
So, the repositories that your package manager is aware of refer to collections of packages for your version of the OS, which is 20.04 (every version has a nickname, and for 20.04 it's "Focal fossa"). The package maintainers collect particular versions of everything from the kernel, to the icons in the menus, to device drivers, to firefox, etc, and put them all together in the repository for folks to download. If there are security fixes for some piece of software, the repository packages will be updated with newer versions, but generally things are otherwise stable. Due to linux being so decentralized, this is needed so they can have a coherent release that actually works... if they just constantly updated the repository with the latest version of everything, it would be a nightmare for users because nothing would work. (If you think dependency hell was rough, imagine being a package maintainer responsible for managing the interoperability between hundreds of different packages written by thousands of different unrelated people and needing everything to work well together on untold numbers of different computer systems.) Different distros have different policies of what gets updated when, some more aggressive, but the "LTS" (long-term support) releases of Ubuntu (e.g. 20.04 that you are running) are conservative and prioritize stability and security over having the latest versions of everything. Ubuntu does keep e.g Firefox relatively up-to-date, but other things can be pretty far behind the latest versions... they stick to what they have had the time to test and vet.

Most people install their preferred distribution with its default packages and if/when they need the latest/greatest they will override the default repositories with custom repos that have later versions of the software. Other times, software developers will actually provide .deb packages that you can install manually, as long as the package manager can satisfy any related dependencies when installing. Other times, developers just design software that installs itself in your system and avoids the packaging mechanism altogether.

Generally, installing a newer version from a trusted third-party repository is pretty harmless and foolproof, but sometimes the dependencies aren't specified correctly.

Also note that the packages that Ubuntu publishes aren't just the same identical software that you might install via other methods; sometimes the "package" also includes little configuration tweaks that make things work correctly on the distro in particular.

The package mechanism also helps prevent incompatible versions of things from being installed at the same time. If you manually install, you can miss these interferences between software.

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In Ubuntu Studio, it seems like I have to find a module or whatever that's particular to my version of Linux - Ubuntu 20.04 (and possibly or ideally from only one, established repository, a 'Canonical' repository?), and that that might entail changing a bunch of other stuff as well. Does that seem like an accurate assessment?
Normally your package manager takes care of all that. You pull up synaptic and it's already (automatically) configured to know what version of your OS to look for packages for. You may have gotten a different impression from having to manually fetch packages for your network card, which does require you to choose correctly.

Canonical is the private company that produces Ubuntu, so the "Canonical" repositories just means the "official" repos for Ubuntu.

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Something I downloaded and installed yesterday, maybe Synaptic, resulted in a line in the dmesg log that said something like 'kernel tainted'
Yeah AFAIK you can ignore it, at least for now. I don't think it's a cause for real concern. dmesg can be scary-looking, but often it's not a big deal (except when it is.)

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I went to an ALSA webpage that had stuff, but I'm not sure if alsa-firmware is alsa-firmware, regardless of where it comes from, or whether there's alsa-firmwares plural, and I need something specific to my Ubuntu install, Ubuntu 20.04 I guess...
Your first choice should always be to install a package via synaptic or the CLI coming from the default repositories provided by Ubuntu/Canonical. These will have been tested (well, theoretically anyway) and are generally the most likely to work. If for some reason they do not, or they aren't available or whatever, then you branch out to official third-party repositories, then to .deb packages provided by trusted sources (which, yes, need to be appropriate to your version of Ubuntu), then to source code that you compile yourself.

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I've looked in my system files and I don't see any folder named ALSA.
I think alsa is installed by default on Ubuntu (might be wrong). You can open a terminal and type "alsa" and then hit tab twice to trigger the autocomplete suggestions. If a bunch of things like "alsa" and "alsactl" and such show up, it's there.

But that doesn't mean the firmware stuff is there, just the alsa system in general.

I would ignore that "patch" stuff until/unless you know you need it.

Quote:
In any event, I'm trying to find Alsa-firmware for my Ubuntu install.
So, that package was mentioned in that forum post, but that's from like 2014. As mentioned, any linux info more than a year or so old should be viewed as highly suspect in the linux world. :-) (Of course, you're in a bind because your sound card was released 16 years ago so it's not going to be possible to find recent info for everything.)

I think the deal is this: the alsa-project.org site is providing the source code under the term "alsa-firmware", and that 'linux from scratch' site is providing instructions (that you apparently followed) to compile and install that code (you did "make" and "make install", right?). Since it worked for you, I'm going to assume that that's cool. Compiling something on your system is generally a pretty good way to ensure at least basic functionality.

But the fact that you ignored the dependency on alsa-tools might be an issue... might not, but it might.

I think the package you were looking for is called, in the current decade :-), "alsa-firmware-loaders". My guess is that that is the package the Ubuntu people put together with the code already compiled so it could be installed more simply. This package is in the default repositories for Ubuntu 20.04.

If you wanted to be super proper, you could try installing the alsa-firmware-loaders package. It might overwrite the stuff you just compiled (and with a slightly older version, though I'd be surprised if that mattered with such an old sound interface.) But it will also install any related dependencies. (Interestingly, the alsa-firmware-loaders package doesn't depend on alsa-tools, so maybe it really isn't a mandatory dependency after all, but that's probably a good package to install anyway.)

There's a chance installing alsa-firmware-loaders might break the success you just had, but if it were me I'd probably go for it just to get back on the 'normal' path of package installation rather than having some possibly-incompatible newer-version compiled code hanging around, maybe causing unexplained headaches later...
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Old 05-15-2021, 11:32 AM   #84
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Originally Posted by Glennbo View Post
This one sounds like you guys may be seeing the difference between the way Linux gets it's time vs. Windows.

Windows uses local time and Linux uses UTC. Back when I dual booted Win7/Xubuntu I forced Windows use UTC and then the clock stayed in sync booting back and forth between OSs.

https://www.howtogeek.com/323390/how...-dual-booting/
Thank you, that did the trick!
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Old 05-15-2021, 12:11 PM   #85
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Thank you, that did the trick!
Glad to hear that was the issue. I remember pulling my hair out and thinking my CMOS battery was going dead when I was first dual booting.
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Old 05-15-2021, 03:10 PM   #86
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Thread is living up to its title
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Old 05-15-2021, 11:38 PM   #87
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^ Not really - I wanted to edit it because I started to realize my circumstances are too specific, probably not very generalizable. Thus far it's all about migrating from Windows to Linux and getting an old audio device going - with a little network stuff throw in...

On the other hand, I might be getting close to actually trying to install REAPER. I'm thinking I probably don't even need to install any special mixer software (the 'EMUtrix' thing, which i did try to compile but wasn't able to).

Had to get some yard/garden work done today so no time to fiddle with computer...


Quote:
Originally Posted by clepsydrae View Post
I know your pain. It's basically a byproduct of Linux having been built up by thousands of people (many volunteering) over many years, with many distros and many different organizations involved, so it's never going to be a simple "this is how it's done" one-size-fits all kind of thing...
Thank you for this very generous response (that whole post).


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Originally Posted by clepsydrae View Post
I think the package you were looking for is called, in the current decade :-), "alsa-firmware-loaders"...
Yeah, I saw that listed and thought the same, but the description only listed a handful of devices that I assumed it was for. Maybe it was just a partial description, or updates or something like that.

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Originally Posted by clepsydrae View Post
If you wanted to be super proper, you could try installing the alsa-firmware-loaders package. It might overwrite the stuff you just compiled (and with a slightly older version, though I'd be surprised if that mattered with such an old sound interface.) But it will also install any related dependencies...
I might try that, just for 'fun', see if it works.



So, as I mentioned, there's a mixer someone made particularly for the emu 1010 varieties. It looks a lot more user-friendly than, say, the 'qasmixer', which is hard to decipher all the I/Os, and the GUI is cumbersome.

Here's a link to the source and instructions: https://code.google.com/archive/p/emutrix/

And at this link, about half way down the page, there seems to be slightly different instructions for compiling it and installing: https://askubuntu.com/questions/2649...rk-with-ubuntu

I tried some of this stuff yesterday, but the compilation didn't work. I seem to have "Qt5" on my machine, so I didn't try to install that, as one of the sets of instructions said to do.

Basically, I'm thinking my failure has to do with old instructions vis-a-vis newer software or whatever I have on my computer. But I'm not sure if that means I have to download old software, like exactly what's described at the second link, or maybe there's something else that can be changed, like a command or instruction somewhere in the source/source files, which would then work with the 'newer' software...

If anyone feels like taking a look at the compile instructions and seeing if they can be 'translated' into the year 2021, that would be very helpful. Basically, both instructions say the source needs to be compiled with Qt(?), Qt4, or Qt5. I don't know what all that entails...


Oh yeah, one more thing I wanted to mention:
Since installing Ubuntu Studio in a dual boot with W7, and flipping from one to the other many times, I noticed that, 1) It seems to boot faster, doesn't have these weird pauses at various junctures, from initial turn ON through the W7 splash screen, and 2) I haven't gotten a blue screen when booting into W7.

I had been getting blue screens at the end of the W7 splash screen like every other boot. I must've booted W7 at least a dozen times since my last Ubuntu install - and no blue screens, no lags.

Is there something about dual booting, letting grub bootloader handle boot, that could have 'fixed' my W7??

Knock on wood. Maybe W7 was botching shutdown, not saving the right info or something for boot?

Last edited by eq1; 05-15-2021 at 11:53 PM.
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Old 05-16-2021, 11:56 AM   #88
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Yeah, I saw that listed and thought the same, but the description only listed a handful of devices that I assumed it was for. Maybe it was just a partial description, or updates or something like that.
Yeah you're right I checked the contents of the .deb and it's probably not what you want.

Quote:
I tried some of this stuff yesterday, but the compilation didn't work. I seem to have "Qt5" on my machine, so I didn't try to install that, as one of the sets of instructions said to do.
Sounds like you need to install package qt5-default and then tweak the emutrix code a little in order to compile it with Qt5 -- did you follow the instructions under "After you are done" in the askubuntu answer? [side note to any others finding this thread: 21.04 lacks the qt5-default package, see here]

The emutrix code was written against Qt4, and the repositories for ubuntu have Qt5 available, so the code won't compile unless it's tweaked a bit according to those instructions. (I recommend not trying to figure out how to install Qt4 in order to compile.)

No idea about the W7 suddenly working. Could be random chance, or maybe there was some corruption in the windows bootloader. Not a common occurrence that dual-booting helps magically fix up windows, AFAIK.
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Old 05-16-2021, 03:39 PM   #89
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Originally Posted by rsntq View Post
You're right, alsa-firmware is not in the Ubuntu repositories. There is a lot of conflicting info out there.

This is it: https://github.com/alsa-project/alsa-firmware

(Click on "Code", then "Download ZIP" to get the files).

That emu folder should be in your /lib/firmware folder.

I still have no idea how this is loaded though. It seems like there is some sort of 'hotplug' loader that does it automatically, or you may still have to compile it yourself. Googling information about this is surprisingly difficult.
The EMU device probably has an sftp (Simple file transfer protocol) server running after power up. An sftp client should be able to connect and send the firmware.

It's a similar process for Emagic A26 and A62 USB interfaces.

Another hard one to research, as sftp means "Secure file transfer protocol" these days. Sigh...
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Old 05-16-2021, 03:52 PM   #90
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The EMU device probably has an sftp (Simple file transfer protocol) server running after power up. An sftp client should be able to connect and send the firmware.

It's a similar process for Emagic A26 and A62 USB interfaces.

Another hard one to research, as sftp means "Secure file transfer protocol" these days. Sigh...
I was wondering about their use of the term "firmware"... so this is actual custom firmware for all these various devices? Wow.

Curiously, OP reported that after compiling/"installing" it (but presumably not flashing it to the device) and rebooting, the device makes sound now (post 82). Maybe it's actually only partially working and the firmware "install" didn't have anything to do with it.
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Old 05-16-2021, 04:13 PM   #91
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It depends on the device what the firmware is, of course. With the Emagic stuff, it's just the software that tells the DSP or FPGA in the interface how to connect everything. There are no effects, no mixing, just a few different configs for different sample rates...

The EMU needs firmware and a mixer software on the computer. I presume default mixer values are zero?

Anyhow, if it's working, I'm sorry to bud in. Missed that.
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Old 05-16-2021, 04:36 PM   #92
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The EMU needs firmware and a mixer software on the computer. I presume default mixer values are zero?
I recently added a Behringer ADA8200 to my UMC1820. All of the new ADA8200 mixer values were zero, and I thought the unit was defective until I found a thread on another site that had this slick trick where you figure out the device number, then using alsamixer send the following which enables all 16 inputs and outputs and sets their levels to 127 then saves the configuration so that it always comes up like that.

When you run alsamixer and hit F6 your audio device will have a number to the left of it. My UMC1820 is number 1, hence the -c 1. This code is for a UMC1820 but might work on other multi-channel audio devices.

Code:
amixer -c 1 cset numid=1 on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on
amixer -c 1 cset numid=3 127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127
amixer -c 1 cset numid=9 on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on,on
amixer -c 1 cset numid=11 127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127,127
amixer -c 1 cset numid=8 0
alsactl store
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Old 05-16-2021, 05:17 PM   #93
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^ Not really - I wanted to edit it because I started to realize my circumstances are too specific, probably not very generalizable. Thus far it's all about migrating from Windows to Linux and getting an old audio device going - with a little network stuff throw in...
Keep the title, I'd say. Its working for me.

Thread is really explaining a few things too me that I'd wondered, its a great resource. And your problems are part of whats so revealing.

For my own purposes, I may be having to try and get a firewire card and focusrite interface working in Linux, so this is all helpful reading and I'm sure it will be to others.
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Old 05-16-2021, 05:32 PM   #94
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...Sounds like you need to install package qt5-default and then tweak the emutrix code a little in order to compile it with Qt5 -- did you follow the instructions under "After you are done" in the askubuntu answer?
I did. I mentioned earlier that I didn't try to install "qt5-default," but actually, I did try the command described at that link to install that, but I think I just got a message like 'no such file or directory exists', and that's when I decided to just try the rest, assuming all the 'qt5' stuff listed on my computer would suffice...

As I recall, when I tried the "qmake" command, the terminal message said 'no such command exists, but you can install it' with such and such command, which I did...

I made edits to the 'pro' file mentioned at the link:

"Here's how to compile this project with Qt5 (you can install Qt5 using sudo apt install qt5-default). Download and extract emutrix0.3.1 and open the file emutrix.pro with a text editor. After the line TEMPLATE = app, insert the following..."

Then it says, "save this file, and at the root of the project run the command qmake."

That must be when I got the first 'no qmake command available' message. Can't remember what happened after I installed that command and tried again. I got some other error message. After that I tried a few other things, like reverting to the instructions at the other link.

I'll have to try all this again and write down the specific errors, look for info about them, etc.

Quick question: when the instructions say, "at the root of the project run the command qmake," "the project" simply means the folder where I've extracted the source material, right? So I'd open a terminal there and execute the command? It doesn't matter where exactly I've extracted the source?


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The emutrix code was written against Qt4, and the repositories for ubuntu have Qt5 available, so the code won't compile unless it's tweaked a bit according to those instructions. (I recommend not trying to figure out how to install Qt4 in order to compile.)
OK, that's critical to know. So it sounds like the source code itself either needs to be compiled with the specific compiler that was intended when the code was written - or various parts of the source need to be edited to accommodate new compiling software, like what was done at the askubuntu link. If that's more or less the case I think I'm understanding things (also more or less)...
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Old 05-16-2021, 05:56 PM   #95
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I was wondering about their use of the term "firmware"... so this is actual custom firmware for all these various devices? Wow.

Curiously, OP reported that after compiling/"installing" it (but presumably not flashing it to the device) and rebooting, the device makes sound now (post 82). Maybe it's actually only partially working and the firmware "install" didn't have anything to do with it.
I haven't been able to test/use it much, plus, this interface has a ton of options, so I don't know what works and what doesn't, yet, and ultimately I won't be able to test everything.

Overall, though, it does appear that the audio dock is communicating with the 1010 PCIe card properly - even better than it did on W7, in fact. For example, I can boot into Ubuntu with the dock OFF, the card loads, and then I can turn the dock ON and it activates - you can hear a relay click. And, when I turn the dock OFF, it clicks OFF. In W7 this whole process was kind of messed-up - I'd have to turn the dock ON first and then open the 'PatchMix' software, and then the dock would activate. Not doing this would simply result in hangs, no activation, etc.

Come to think of it, this is actually fixed in W7, now, as well. I can turn the dock ON and OFF and it activates, I don't have to turn the dock on first and then load PatchMix. Pretty weird. It's like something I've done in Ubuntu - maybe that ALSA firmware thing - has tweaked the PCIe card or the dock, like made some change. I don't see how that weird startup and shutdown behavior could be altered otherwise...

Anyway, like I said, so far I can't tell how well the card + dock are working. There do seem to be various quirks, such as the sample rate. It defaults to 48k, and when I change it to 44.1k, it plays the music slower. I don't think I've been able to play anything at 44.1k normally... Thus far the only thing I've tried is 2 channel stereo output - I got that.

I think I need to get that EMUtrix mixer going, it clearly delineates in the GUI what controls correspond to which inputs, outputs and other functionality on the emu dock. Was having a hard time figuring that out with the 'qasmixer'. Alternatively, I could try to install REAPER and see what shows up there. I think I'd rather get EMUtrix going first, though, rather than adding another piece to the puzzle.

I should have some time tonight, but definitely this week, to dig in some more...
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Old 05-16-2021, 05:58 PM   #96
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Keep the title, I'd say. Its working for me...
I will - I don't think I can edit it, anyway.
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Old 05-16-2021, 06:12 PM   #97
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More 'quick questions' for anyone in the know:

One thing that bugs me about this W7/Ubuntu dual boot - from Ubuntu I can access files located on the W7 partition, but from W7 I can't access files on the Ubuntu partitions.

In W7's 'my computer', I only see the partition on which W7 is installed, drive letter 'C'. In W7's 'disk management' utility I see 4 partitions, the one for W7 and 3 for Ubuntu (the 3 I made when I installed Ubuntu). In W7 they're labeled "healthy, primary," but that's it, no drive letter, etc.

Can I make these partitions accessible in W7 without screwing something up in Ubuntu? It doesn't look like it - if I right click on one of the Ubuntu partitions, I get no options, no 'add a drive letter' or the like. The only option is 'delete the volume'...


hmm, maybe it has to do with the Ubuntu partitions being formatted as EXT4 or something like that, rather than NTFS, and Windows can't read that?

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Old 05-16-2021, 06:21 PM   #98
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I wouldn't trust Windows 7 to have access to a Linux partition.

First it will create a hidden system folder named "System Volume Information", then Win7 would very possibly decide to fix problems with the volume and render it useless.
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Old 05-16-2021, 06:53 PM   #99
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^ Yeah, something akin that crossed my mind. My preliminary internet searching seems to say the issue is what I 'hmmed' about - W7 can't read Ext4. But it looks like there's 3rd-party programs that can deal with that.* I'll have to read some more, look around.

* Here's an example: https://www.howtogeek.com/112888/3-w...-from-windows/

The author mentions enabling read-only is fine, but writing might be sketchy...
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Old 05-16-2021, 07:15 PM   #100
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^ Yeah, something akin that crossed my mind. My preliminary internet searching seems to say the issue is what I 'hmmed' about - W7 can't read Ext4. But it looks like there's 3rd-party programs that can deal with that.* I'll have to read some more, look around.

* Here's an example: https://www.howtogeek.com/112888/3-w...-from-windows/

The author mentions enabling read-only is fine, but writing might be sketchy...
Set to read only might be okay. When I was dual booting Win7 and Xubuntu, each OS was on their own 250GB SSD, plus I had a 1TB HDD formatted NTFS so both OSs could access it. One day I boot up the Win7 side of the machine and Windows starts running a disk scan and telling me how it is FIXING things.

Once I got booted up my entire 1TB HDD was smoked with only some useless .chk files.
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Old 05-16-2021, 07:36 PM   #101
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I did. I mentioned earlier that I didn't try to install "qt5-default," but actually, I did try the command described at that link to install that, but I think I just got a message like 'no such file or directory exists', and that's when I decided to just try the rest, assuming all the 'qt5' stuff listed on my computer would suffice...
Hmm. "sudo apt install qt5-default" should either work or say "qt5-default is already at the latest version".

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As I recall, when I tried the "qmake" command, the terminal message said 'no such command exists, but you can install it' with such and such command, which I did...
So that kinda implies that qt5 was in fact not installed... qt5-default indicates qt5-qmake as a dependency, but it's a "suggests", so if you had trouble installing qt5-default or if for some reason the "suggested" packages weren't also installed (which can happen depending on how you install a package), you might not have gotten it.

Upshot: you gotta install qt5-default for this thing to compile, AFAIK.

Also make sure you installed the packages as directed in the "0. pre-reqs" section at the top.

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Quick question: when the instructions say, "at the root of the project run the command qmake," "the project" simply means the folder where I've extracted the source material, right? So I'd open a terminal there and execute the command? It doesn't matter where exactly I've extracted the source?
Correct -- you cd into the emutrix0.3.1 directory (or open a terminal there, as you suggest). To confirm, you can use "ls" to list the contents of the current directory, and it should contain a file called "Makefile" "emutrix.pro" which qmake will be using, which will mean you are at the right directory level.

And yeah, source location doesn't matter. There are some obscure cases where the type of filesystem can matter to things (e.g. NTFS vs ext4 vs FAT32 vs whatever) and it's best to do this kind of thing on a "modern" filesystem that linux supports well (e.g. not FAT32 or NTFS) but it doesn't generally matter which directory it sits in. (Your filesystem is probably ext4 and nothing to worry about.)

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OK, that's critical to know. So it sounds like the source code itself either needs to be compiled with the specific compiler that was intended when the code was written
...nope:

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or various parts of the source need to be edited to accommodate new compiling software, like what was done at the askubuntu link.
Close -- it's not the compiling software per se (which will be triggered in the background by the "make" command) it's the existing libraries that the compilation will be linking in during compilation (e.g. Qt5) which have changed in the intervening years and which the old code doesn't know how to connect with properly. Hence the file tweaks to make it work.

(Qt5 is a 'widgets' library -- a way for developers to write software that works on multiple platforms without having to code GUI widgets from scratch -- sliders, checkboxes, menus, etc -- for every project.)

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Come to think of it, this is actually fixed in W7, now, as well. I can turn the dock ON and OFF and it activates, I don't have to turn the dock on first and then load PatchMix. Pretty weird. It's like something I've done in Ubuntu - maybe that ALSA firmware thing - has tweaked the PCIe card or the dock, like made some change.
Yeah, interesting. I've seen behavior like this in a network card before, where linux and windows left it in some slightly different state that affected how it operated after the first boot in the other operating system. Might have something to do with the lack of blue screens in W7 now -- maybe linux has accidentally or intentionally straightened something out. :-) I wonder if repeated boots into Windows will cause the blue screens etc. to come back until the next boot into linux.

And while I'm thinking of it: now that you are dual-booting, make sure to turn off Hibernation in both operating systems (and "Sleep" modes to be safe). I haven't looked this up recently, but historically this has been a source of pain: if you hibernate from windows, forget, and then boot to linux, and then boot to windows, windows will come out of "hibernation" with assumptions about what state the disk is in, etc, which may now be wrong because you changed things from the linux side without it knowing. I think the same risk applies to linux.

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One thing that bugs me about this W7/Ubuntu dual boot - from Ubuntu I can access files located on the W7 partition, but from W7 I can't access files on the Ubuntu partitions.
Yeah we probably should have covered this before your install, whoops. :-) Windows can't read ext4 (and I wouldn't rely on the options you linked to). Linux has support for NTFS, but it's imperfect. Personally, I've used it forever (NTFS drives on linux) without issue, but the official line is that support is not great, and admittedly there are some wrinkles now and then. I haven't had issues like Glennbo mentioned, but I maybe turned off windows disk checking or something. Sometimes NTFS drives get a little wigged out between linux and windows, but it always takes care of itself.

Unfortunately, for sharing partitions between windows and linux there is no good option besides NTFS that I have found (and I have looked.)

So the normal thing is to have a shared partition or two formatted as NTFS and to use that for project files and the like. The stuff in / and /home you don't generally need to access from Windows anyway, except what may default to going in /home/username/Documents or whatever, but I don't use those directories.

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Old 05-16-2021, 11:45 PM   #102
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Set to read only might be okay. When I was dual booting Win7 and Xubuntu, each OS was on their own 250GB SSD, plus I had a 1TB HDD formatted NTFS so both OSs could access it. One day I boot up the Win7 side of the machine and Windows starts running a disk scan and telling me how it is FIXING things.

Once I got booted up my entire 1TB HDD was smoked with only some useless .chk files.
Between what you and clepsydrae say, and what I found trying one of the 3rd party apps, I think I'll just live with it. The app I tried didn't work - it'd assign a drive letter, but trying to open the volume in Windows explorer I'd get a message that'd say, 'unable to access, needs to be formatted.' The solutions suggested at app's website didn't work either, so it doesn't inspire much confidence in the app.


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Hmm. "sudo apt install qt5-default" should either work or say "qt5-default is already at the latest version"... So that kinda implies that qt5 was in fact not installed...
I'll have to try it all again. I don't recall seeing anything named "qt5-default" in the Synaptic package manager, and it didn't load with that command. Yet, I already have a bunch of applications in the start menu with 'Qt5" in the name, as well as, as I recall, files/folders in the system with Qt5, so I presumed I probably already had it installed. Sounds like that's probably not the case...


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Close -- it's not the compiling software per se (which will be triggered in the background by the "make" command) it's the existing libraries that the compilation will be linking in during compilation (e.g. Qt5) which have changed in the intervening years and which the old code doesn't know how to connect with properly. Hence the file tweaks to make it work.

(Qt5 is a 'widgets' library -- a way for developers to write software that works on multiple platforms without having to code GUI widgets from scratch -- sliders, checkboxes, menus, etc -- for every project.)
I think I understand, makes sense...


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Originally Posted by clepsydrae View Post
I've seen behavior like this in a network card before, where linux and windows left it in some slightly different state that affected how it operated after the first boot in the other operating system. Might have something to do with the lack of blue screens in W7 now -- maybe linux has accidentally or intentionally straightened something out. :-) I wonder if repeated boots into Windows will cause the blue screens etc. to come back until the next boot into linux.
I was wondering the same thing. And I guess that knocking on wood didn't help - because the next and last time I re-booted W7 I was getting the same stalls and lags as before. Ultimately no blue screen, but it was acting like it was on the cusp... At these blue screen junctures, just prior to them, W7 is churning and burning on something, I hear my CPU fan ramp up, operations, like mouse movement and cursor, sometimes stall, etc. The blue screen error, BTW, always says 'a clock interrupt wasn't received in time', or something like that...

I think this last reboot was the first time I re-booted back into W7 without a boot into Ubuntu first. The previous dozen or so times I was going back and forth.

On the weird behavior of my dock and audio card in W7, I might've been wrong about that. I just tried to open PatchMix first and turn on the dock, but it didn't work. I might've been thinking that the dock doesn't activate until PatchMix is opened, when in fact it does activate if you just turn it ON - but without PatchMix loaded yet. I'll have to experiment some more.


You know, it's weird: when you turn the dock on, the various LEDs, such as input level meters, LED indicating phantom power, etc., light-up in various patterns, depending on what state the device is in.* It's similar to how older computers, like my Dell, have a beep code when you boot, with different beep patterns indicating different problems. The thing is, I've never been able to find anything that actually describes what the LED lighting patterns mean. I do see different patterns though - just have no clue what they mean.

* Here's one, for the hell of it: the input level meters on two input channels have 4 LEDs each, I think yellow, orange, green, green. The 48V phantom power has a red LED. After having turned the dock on, then PatchMix, which enables the system, I turned the dock OFF and then back ON - the two orange LEDs + the red phantom power one are all lit. I can't activate the system until I close PatchMix and then restart the dock. In general, normally, all or most of the LEDs are lit and turn OFF once the dock is 'booted'. Sometimes not all the LEDs are lit though, one or two will be dark. Doesn't do much good without a code key - I'm sure I've combed through the manual more than once to find one.

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Old 05-17-2021, 12:10 AM   #103
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Just a follow-up on the network card issue I was having:

I probably would have been better-off just buying a different card, rather than spending a few days trying to sort out the problem. They're pretty inexpensive, and apparently Broadcom-based cards often have issues with Linux. I ran into this article that gives recommendations for 4 PCIe-based cards that work well in Linux, here's a link: https://www.addictivetips.com/buying...s-cards-linux/
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Old 05-17-2021, 12:49 AM   #104
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I'll have to try it all again. I don't recall seeing anything named "qt5-default" in the Synaptic package manager, and it didn't load with that command. Yet, I already have a bunch of applications in the start menu with 'Qt5" in the name, as well as, as I recall, files/folders in the system with Qt5, so I presumed I probably already had it installed. Sounds like that's probably not the case...
OK, correction to all this: I had one thing with "Qt5" in the 'start menu' - "Qt5 settings." The 'bunch of stuff' was what Synaptic was showing I have installed, and it was all from the main 'Canonical' repository. There is no "Qt5-default" in that repository, but it does show up when I add 'community-maintained'.

I tried installing that, but Synaptic shows it as "broken." When I list broken packages I have about 4 or 5. When I try to fix them in Synaptic I get a handful of error messages...

I'll have to work through this tomorrow Monday.
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Old 05-17-2021, 10:32 AM   #105
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it does show up when I add 'community-maintained'.
Ah yes, this is a good thing to enable, generally, and many online instructions will assume that you have.

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I tried installing that, but Synaptic shows it as "broken." When I list broken packages I have about 4 or 5. When I try to fix them in Synaptic I get a handful of error messages...
Ok, perhaps some of the unorthodox package installing you have done is coming back to bite. :-) Presumably you tried "Edit->Fix broken packages"? You could try from the command line: "sudo apt-get -f install". But I'm shooting in the dark.

Re: LED's, etc -- with older school autio interfaces I definitely encountered the kind of behavior you describe; getting an older firewire device going was tricky. I can't remember the details now, but the order things were turned on in mattered. I think the device had to be up and running before linux booted, and then it would work, or something like that, otherwise no luck. And if the device was power cycled while linux was running, you had to stop/start some kernel services or modules or some such to get it going again. Modern devices are friendlier in this regard. My USB interface for example reestablishes OK, but I do still need to kill and restart JACK (and qjackctl) to get them working again, and then issue some pulseaudio commands to set it as the system sound card again.
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Old 05-17-2021, 03:52 PM   #106
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OK, so I'm back at Ubuntu, trying to install the Qt5-default package that's required to compile the 'EMUtrix' mixer made for my audio device. I'm in Synaptic package manager, and everything looks fine before marking Qt5-default - no broken packages, etc.

When I mark Qt5-default, I get a red exclamation mark that means "broken" package. There's a shit-load of things that get marked for removal (~36), and about 10 things that get marked for installation. When I filter the list to show broken packages, I have 5...

When I hit "apply," a message reads 'fix broken packages first'.

When I select edit, fix broken packages, I get this list of errors:

"E: Unable to correct problems, you have held broken packages.
E: Error, pkgProblemResolver::Resolve generated breaks, this may be caused by held packages.
E: Unable to correct dependencies
E: Error, pkgProblemResolver::Resolve generated breaks, this may be caused by held packages.
E: Unable to correct dependencies"

I'm gonna search online for answers, but in the meantime, maybe someone knows what this all means? Is that many packages marked for removal typical when installing a single, new package??


My guess is that all these packages meant for removal depend on something that installation of Qt5-default will negate, or undo, or something like that... But that's just a guess.


edit: hmm, when I select properties/description in the Qt5-default entry in Synaptic, it says this: "This package should not be used for building Debian packages. Take a
look at https://qt-kde-team.pages.debian.net...asedstuff.html for more information."

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Old 05-17-2021, 04:12 PM   #107
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I'm in Synaptic package manager, and everything looks fine before marking Qt5-default - no broken packages, etc.
Start synaptic, hit the "custom filters" button, and select "Broken" -- does anything appear?

Quote:
When I mark Qt5-default, I get a red exclamation mark that means "broken" package. There's a shit-load of things that get marked for removal (~36), and about 10 things that get marked for installation. When I filter the list to show broken packages, I have 5...

When I hit "apply," a message reads 'fix broken packages first'.
First I would advise you not to be too trigger happy with Synaptic (or any package manager) as you can easily bork your system, especially when packages are being removed. Can you copy/paste the list of to-install/to-remove packages here?

Quote:
Is that many packages marked for removal typical when installing a single, new package??
The dependency tree can sometimes surprise you, so it's smart to check it over before installing. A classic example is that you might be using a distro with one desktop environment (say, KDE) and you go to install some little 5k utility program that depends on something that depends on something that depends on GNOME being installed, so the little 5k utility install will trigger the install of an entire giant desktop environment.

It's possible that in order to install qt5-default synaptic has determined that it has to uninstall something else that conflicts, or an earlier version of something, etc, hence my request that you post the list here before going further.

You can try some of the remedies in the fourth answer ("These are some fast and easy ways to fix the you have held broken packages error") here: https://askubuntu.com/questions/2232...roken-packages ... the other answers might be valuable but notice that they are pushing 10 years old.

But first thing: open Synaptic and click the "Reload" button. This is equivalent to "sudo apt-get update" and it refreshes package managers' notion of the current state of the packages in the repos, which apparently can cause this sometimes. Then try to install qt5-default and see what happens.

And post things here before pulling triggers if you want some feedback first.
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Old 05-17-2021, 05:13 PM   #108
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Start synaptic, hit the "custom filters" button, and select "Broken" -- does anything appear?
That's what I did earlier, no broken packages.

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Originally Posted by clepsydrae View Post
First I would advise you not to be too trigger happy with Synaptic (or any package manager) as you can easily bork your system, especially when packages are being removed. Can you copy/paste the list of to-install/to-remove packages here?
I was gonna do that but the list isn't copy-and-pastable, don't see any copy tool. I tried taking a screen shot and using whatever image tool in Ubuntu, that I'm not used to, but it was taking too long to figure things out...

Not being too trigger happy comment duly noted. At this point I don't think I care too much about botching the entire system, because it'd almost be easier, probably better, to start over and be more meticulous with 'my methods' than to sort through some of these problems...

For example, there's so much stuff loaded in Ubuntu Studio that maybe it'd be better to start with something a little leaner - fewer potential conflicts?. Maybe I'll just buy a new Wifi network adapter and avoid all the Broadcom shenanigans. Instead of putzing my way into getting my emu audio device installed I'd go straight to loading the ALSA-firmware. Etc etc...

Seems like I'll likely be starting over anyway at some point, just to be sure I got everything on the level, from start to finish... I don't want to build a 'house of cards' here; on the other hand, I'm fine with doing that now in the interest of experimentation, and I guess just learning my way around.


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...It's possible that in order to install qt5-default synaptic has determined that it has to uninstall something else that conflicts, or an earlier version of something, etc, hence my request that you post the list here before going further.
Yeah, I think that looks like what's going on. Rather than post the whole list of slated removals and installs, though, I think there's a more direct assessment in one of the 'broken packages' windows. Let me look through those and see if I can find some better clues...


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Originally Posted by clepsydrae View Post
You can try some of the remedies in the fourth answer ("These are some fast and easy ways to fix the you have held broken packages error") here: https://askubuntu.com/questions/2232...roken-packages ... the other answers might be valuable but notice that they are pushing 10 years old.
I'll take a look at this...

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But first thing: open Synaptic and click the "Reload" button. This is equivalent to "sudo apt-get update" and it refreshes package managers' notion of the current state of the packages in the repos, which apparently can cause this sometimes. Then try to install qt5-default and see what happens.
I had reloaded the list before I tried the Qt5-default stuff above.
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Old 05-17-2021, 05:19 PM   #109
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That's what I did earlier, no broken packages.
Hmm. When you applied the install for qt5-default, did it immediately complain about broken packages or did it first go through some shenanigans of downloading/installing and then complain?

Quote:
I was gonna do that but the list isn't copy-and-pastable, don't see any copy tool.
Oh right. This'll probably be easier via the command line:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install qt5-default

...then you should be able to copy/paste the result from the terminal window. Synaptic is great but when you want to get real the command line can be easier to deal with... it tends to produce more verbose output, and is often more useful to others that may be able to help.
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Old 05-17-2021, 05:32 PM   #110
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Hmm. When you applied the install for qt5-default, did it immediately complain about broken packages or did it first go through some shenanigans of downloading/installing and then complain?
Immediately complained... I just tried it again to be sure: mark Qt5-default for installation, window pops up that says such and such packages need to be removed, such and such need to be installed, and asks whether I want to mark the changes. When I hit "mark," the red exclamation mark immediately shows up next to line for Qt5-default, along with all the other icons and colors (red, green, etc.) for all other packages that are affected...

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Oh right. This'll probably be easier via the command line...
I'll try the command line in some minutes - I decided to try to screenshot the list and use GIMP to cobble it together (it's long)... If I can't get that going within a few minutes, I'll bail and try command line.



OK, commandline easier, here's what it says:

"sudo apt-get install qt5-default
E: Could not get lock /var/lib/dpkg/lock-frontend. It is held by process 1914 (synaptic)
N: Be aware that removing the lock file is not a solution and may break your system.
E: Unable to acquire the dpkg frontend lock (/var/lib/dpkg/lock-frontend), is another process using it?"

Oh, wait a second, I think I need to close Synaptic first...

OK, now here's what it says:

"Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information... Done
Some packages could not be installed. This may mean that you have
requested an impossible situation or if you are using the unstable
distribution that some required packages have not yet been created
or been moved out of Incoming.
The following information may help to resolve the situation:

The following packages have unmet dependencies:
qt5-default : Depends: qtbase5-dev (= 5.12.8+dfsg-0ubuntu1) but it is not going to be installed or
qtbase5-gles-dev (>= 5.12.8+dfsg) but it is not going to be installed
E: Unable to correct problems, you have held broken packages."

Last edited by eq1; 05-17-2021 at 05:46 PM.
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Old 05-17-2021, 05:51 PM   #111
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Here's a screenshot of the list of changes in Synaptic:
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Old 05-17-2021, 06:27 PM   #112
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Hrm, yeah, that seems a little whack. The red lines with "X" I presume are the "to be removed"... something seems awry.

Just for fun, try this in a terminal:

sudo apt install debtree
debtree -R qtbase5-dev | dot -Tpng > /tmp/out.png

...then post the image you find at /tmp/out.png

I have a feeling this might be a "start again and be more careful this time" situation (e.g. don't install qmake separately.) This could no doubt be sorted out, but I won't be able to help in an efficient way. Maybe those more savvy in the ways of package management and qt5 can jump in.

It also might be worth looking in to what the real value of Ubuntu Studio might be these days. Historically, if I understand correctly, it offered real-time kernels and other system tweaks that made a difference to audio processing, but I'm not sure if that's true anymore. It might just be a convenience thing that pre-installs a bunch of stuff, in which case I would say forget it and just install regular ubuntu and whatever software you desire the regular way. Helps narrow things down in cases like this. Just a thought. Others might chime in... I've never used any of the AV-oriented linuxes.
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Old 05-17-2021, 06:38 PM   #113
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Just for fun, try this in a terminal:

sudo apt install debtree
debtree -R qtbase5-dev | dot -Tpng > /tmp/out.png

...then post the image you find at /tmp/out.png
I did it, but it's a HUGE image -you want me to post that (it's 12MB, too)?


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I have a feeling this might be a "start again and be more careful this time" situation (e.g. don't install qmake separately.)...
Ha, funny, that exact thought crossed my mind, the installing qmake thing.


edit: I don't think there's any way to 'post' that image, not in a way that could be viewed here. The compressed size is 12MB, but the uncompressed size is like 1.9GB! It's like 18ft wide. I tried to shrink it by a factor of 10, but then it's not legible... I could probably upload it to a dropbox though (or the one I use, onedrive).

The lines have colors, so converting to BW would ruin that, not sure how to shrink the file size and still have it be legible. I'm not even sure how my photoshop handled it - I have photoshop linked to a ramdisk that's only 1.2GB - it filled it up completely.

BTW, what do the colored lines mean - blue, red, green?

Here's a link to the image - if you can, maybe try to download it first rather than having it open in your browser or whatever: https://1drv.ms/u/s!AskciUu3eSuSgSSy...RZdVG?e=cx9XyD

Last edited by eq1; 05-17-2021 at 07:27 PM.
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Old 05-17-2021, 08:56 PM   #114
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I did it, but it's a HUGE image -you want me to post that (it's 12MB, too)?
I got it from the download, thanks.

I'm not particularly qualified to interpret it, but it seems to my ignorant eye to imply that installing qt5-default wants to install some mesa-related packages (low-level graphics library for the OS) that conflict with other mesa packages on the system (which can't be removed because other things depend on them.)

Don't take my word for that, but I'm getting that vibe in the graph. If that's correct, it means that the packages in the repo are just broken, or that you may have borked things along the way.

Quote:
BTW, what do the colored lines mean - blue, red, green?
You can open a terminal and use the "man" command (short for "manual") to get the "man page" for most commands in linux, so:
"man debtree" -- this has the color code. Navigation of a "man page" is similar to what I described for journalctl in post 54.

I found this: https://superuser.com/questions/1370...le-to-download
...which implies that the package from the repo aren't maybe the best bet for installing Qt (contrary to everything you've been told in this thread, I realize)... so maybe it's worth trying it their way, which is to download a small installed app from here and run that. Maybe it will be better/smarter at installing on your system. If that fails, maybe the next step is to try a fresh installation, I dunno. Just kinda guessing at this point.
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Old 05-17-2021, 11:04 PM   #115
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Originally Posted by clepsydrae View Post
I got it from the download, thanks. I'm not particularly qualified to interpret it, but...
Who would be - it's a mess! But seriously, I get it, it was 'just for fun'...


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Originally Posted by clepsydrae View Post
You can open a terminal and use the "man" command (short for "manual") to get the "man page" for most commands in linux, so...
Very helpful. I've seen "man" page before, it just hasn't gelled quite yet that I've got to be looking for answers that way. It's just never been the go-to resource for me and computers. It's exactly what I've been needing though, it's like I have a question about everything. Can't keep asking for help in a REAPER forum, or searching the internet for every little thing...


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Originally Posted by clepsydrae View Post
I found this: https://superuser.com/questions/1370...le-to-download
...which implies that the package from the repo aren't maybe the best bet for installing Qt (contrary to everything you've been told in this thread, I realize)...If that fails, maybe the next step is to try a fresh installation, I dunno. Just kinda guessing at this point.
I'll check that out. I do realize that my problems have become hard to decipher - could be this, could be that. You've gone way above the 'call of duty' for me. I'm truly grateful for all your help. There's a lot of stuff here I can go back to, too, to review - a solid touchstone for my nascent journey into Linux...

So, yeah, I'll check that thread out, try whatever might seem fruitful, but in general I'm expecting to start over. I might try a REAPER install before I start over though - push a little farther before I risk burning-out having to do things over.
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Old 05-18-2021, 11:16 AM   #116
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Glad to help, insomuch as I could, and I'm sure the others are too. Linux users gotta look out for each other. :-)

There is this utility "aptitude" that might help; I haven't used it myself, but you can try:

sudo apt-get install aptitude
sudo aptitude why-not qt5-default

...I suspect it'll just tell you something like what Synaptic told you, but it might have more details.

re: Reaper I think you'll find the installation very simple compared to all this other stuff. After you extract it there is an installation script you run in a terminal that will walk you through it. (Though personally I always just do portable installs as I find them simpler to deal with... instructions in my sig.)
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Old 05-18-2021, 03:30 PM   #117
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^ I read the material at that link you previously posted, that included info about "aptitude." I might try it. I'm basically trying to re-group at this point, re-reading stuff, figuring out what I missed, how I did things, what I'd need to do if I start over, etc. Also looking into installing REAPER, maybe trying a different 'repo' or distro or whatever - operating system (probably not, though).


Bumped into this recent thread post that does a nice job of framing the types of questions one might think about when deciding 'what distro' to use, thought it'd be good to put a link here:

"Long-winded post about Linux distros and configuration":
https://forum.cockos.com/showpost.ph...07&postcount=7

See clepsydrae's link to, "How to Do a Portable Install," in his sig in above post.
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Old 05-18-2021, 05:35 PM   #118
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I decided to try a portable install of REAPER on Ubuntu Studio 20.04. I downloaded the latest Linux Reaper, extracted, the readme file lists a few requirements. I'm trying to figure out if my system meets those requirements, but I'm having a hard time doing so.

Here's what the requirements are:

"+ libc6, libstdc++ for gcc 4.x or later
+ libgdk-3 (you can also target headless or libgdk-2 if you build your own
libSwell from WDL, see below)
+ ALSA"


I have ALSA. I open Synaptic and search for libc6 and I have that installed. I do the same for libstdc++. Here the closest thing I have installed is labeled "libstdc++6". The next closest is "libstdc++-9-dev". Out of all packages listed I see nothing labeled "libstdc++" exactly, they all have extra stuff appended to that name.

I've done some internet searching but can't find anything that explains the naming conventions - What do extra dashes (or minus sign?) and numbers mean? What about extra letters, like "dev"? Is libstdc++6 the same as libstdc++, is it for gcc 4.x or later* - How do I figure this stuff out?

With Synaptic I also search for libgdk-3. One result, labeled librust-gdk-sys-dev and described as "FFI bindings to libgdk-3-Rust source code."

Not sure where to go from here...

* When I open the package properties window in Synaptic, it says that libstdc++6 breaks gcc-4.3 through 4.5...

edit: For the hell of it, I tried sudo apt-get install libstdc++ and among other stuff this is what the readout said:

"libstdc++-9-dev is already the newest version (9.3.0-17ubuntu1~20.04).
libstdc++6 is already the newest version (10.2.0-5ubuntu1~20.04).
libstdc++6 set to manually installed."

My guess is that libstdc++6 is a newer version of libstdc++ and that it likely supports gcc4.x or higher - except not 4.3-4.5. Or that omitting the numeral in the REAPER install readme is Cocko's assuming you understand the numeral is a version, and maybe coincides with the numeral in the gcc version?? WTF, I don't know.

Last edited by eq1; 05-18-2021 at 06:02 PM.
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Old 05-18-2021, 06:58 PM   #119
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Those look like the requirements for building libSwell, which you don't have to do. Don't worry about the requirements and just run the install script. Even a normal install of Ubuntu should meet the requirements, let alone Ubuntu studio.
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Old 05-18-2021, 07:02 PM   #120
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hmm, I'll trust what you say, but those requirements are literally the first thing the readme says, verbatim:

"Welcome to the REAPER 6.28 for linux/x86_64 tarball

- Requirements:

+ libc6, libstdc++ for gcc 4.x or later
+ libgdk-3 (you can also target headless or libgdk-2 if you build your own
libSwell from WDL, see below)
+ ALSA"
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