Old 10-06-2019, 07:38 PM   #1
RDBOIS
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Default Spread the Love for the Multiple Takes

Just saying:

I'm outing myself as a serious "multiple take" artist/mixer/producer. If I play guitar and sing in your living room, I'm awesome, but really..., it sucks, technically speaking.

I respect those who can cut a track in one take.

But, can we be honest?

Raise your hand proudly and spread the love for the multiple take artists. Nothing to be ashamed about. Playing and singing by the campfire is not the same as "nailing a perfect track" in the studio.

If you have needed multiple takes, we love you.

If you cut, splice, re-arrange, paste, stretch, etc., we love you.

If you record everything in one take? F*ck you! LOL Just kidding.
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Old 10-06-2019, 09:50 PM   #2
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It's always full of mistakes, but there's just something special about the first take. Sometimes the first is the one.
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Old 10-07-2019, 02:53 AM   #3
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Using multiple takes is part of my creative process. I start recording takes as soon as I start noodling around with a track, whether on vocals or an instrument. That way, if I have an idea in an early take that I forget, or I decide I like something better in an early take, I can always go back and recapture it. Most times, the early takes get deleted. But sometimes not. So it's worth keeping them until the comping phase. And I almost always comp takes - I'm a decent player, but knowing I have the option to screw up gives me the freedom to experiment and try things, rather than playing it safe hoping for that "perfect take".

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Originally Posted by RDBOIS View Post
Just saying:

I'm outing myself as a serious "multiple take" artist/mixer/producer. If I play guitar and sing in your living room, I'm awesome, but really..., it sucks, technically speaking.

I respect those who can cut a track in one take.

But, can we be honest?

Raise your hand proudly and spread the love for the multiple take artists. Nothing to be ashamed about. Playing and singing by the campfire is not the same as "nailing a perfect track" in the studio.

If you have needed multiple takes, we love you.

If you cut, splice, re-arrange, paste, stretch, etc., we love you.

If you record everything in one take? F*ck you! LOL Just kidding.
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Old 10-07-2019, 09:07 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by drichard View Post
Using multiple takes is part of my creative process. I start recording takes as soon as I start noodling around with a track
That's exactly how I roll as well. Sure fire way to get rid of red light syndrome is to always be recording. And well, you never know...

Cool feature that helps me keep clutter to a minimun is that I add a shortcut for "stop and delete all recorded media" in the alternative recording actions, so if I have a long run of crap takes I know I'll never use, I can just get rid of them instantly.
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Old 10-07-2019, 12:59 PM   #5
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I have a toolbar button with the "Delete Active Take" action assigned so that I can quickly and easily delete any take that I know will not be used.

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That's exactly how I roll as well. Sure fire way to get rid of red light syndrome is to always be recording. And well, you never know...

Cool feature that helps me keep clutter to a minimun is that I add a shortcut for "stop and delete all recorded media" in the alternative recording actions, so if I have a long run of crap takes I know I'll never use, I can just get rid of them instantly.
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Old 10-07-2019, 02:07 PM   #6
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Yea me too. What I'm talking about though is when I've done 50 of the same take and they all suck. I hit one button to stop the recording and remove the files from my hard disk (not just the takes from the project).

At this point I take a little break and usually nail it on the next take. Saves me somewhat from having to delete unused recordings later when my hard drive is filling up.
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Old 10-08-2019, 10:30 AM   #7
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I would say I use a combo of both multi takes and one take. I tend to "practice" with many takes, but at the end I'm only using one final performance and the rest are deleted. Sometimes I will cut/splice/paste small bits that are too difficult to punch in or otherwise redo. I just prefer the sound, look, and feel of one consistent take, although I have many clients who prefer to punch in many many times, getting each phrase perfect.
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Old 10-08-2019, 11:43 AM   #8
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I wouldn't judge either way but here are some things to consider where you means proverbial you...

1. If you hit stop as soon as you make a mistake, stop doing that now because it is actually molding you into not being able to perform anything consistently for more than a few seconds or minute at a time.

2. Along with #1, always try to do full song takes. Want to record lots of takes, then record lots beginning to end takes regardless of mistakes. Unless a mistake is so devastating to your frame of thought that you can't get back on track at all (and maybe even then), just keep going till the end.

3. You can still do punch ins and fix ups but do them after you're done recording the beginning-to-end takes.

4. If you keep stopping and doing new takes early, the number of takes tend to pile up earlier in the song. Then you need that perfect take #22 near the end of the song, but it isn't there because you stopped short.

There is a sort of irony where certain multi-take habits can compound the reason one needs to do multiple takes to begin with. Conversely if you follow habits similar to the above, you get multi-takes AND better at not needing them.

There is surely nothing wrong with doing lots of takes, I do them all the time but how we approach them can have various levels of impact.
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Last edited by karbomusic; 10-08-2019 at 11:50 AM.
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Old 10-08-2019, 11:54 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karbomusic View Post
I wouldn't judge either way but here are some things to consider where you means proverbial you...

1. If you hit stop as soon as you make a mistake, stop doing that now because it is actually molding you into not being able to perform anything consistently for more than a few seconds or minute at a time.

2. Along with #1, always try to do full song takes. Want to record lots of takes, then record lots beginning to end takes regardless of mistakes. Unless a mistake is so devastating to your frame of thought that you can't get back on track at all (and maybe even then), just keep going till the end.

3. You can still do punch ins and fix ups but do them after you're done recording the beginning-to-end takes.

4. If you keep stopping and doing new takes early, the number of takes tend to pile up earlier in the song. Then you need that perfect take #22 near the end of the song, but it isn't there because you stopped short.

There is a sort of irony where certain multi-take habits can compound the reason one needs to do multiple takes to begin with. Conversely if you follow habits similar to the above, you get multi-takes AND better at not needing them.

There is surely nothing wrong with doing lots of takes, I do them all the time but how we approach them can have various levels of impact.
100% agreed on doing takes start to finish. Not only does it help you perform better and longer (haha, go ahead with that one) but will help you perfect the entire performance overall...especially helpful if/when you decide to perform at concerts, where you don't get the luxury of "do-overs".
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